In the landmark 1965 case of Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court examined a Connecticut statute that made it a crime for any person to use contraception.

Griswold v. Connecticut

In the landmark 1965 case of Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court examined a Connecticut statute that made it a crime for any person to use contraception. The majority declared the law an unconstitutional violation of the right of privacy. Justice Black dissented, saying, “I do not to any extent whatever base my view that this Connecticut law is constitutional on a belief that the law is wise or that its policy is a good one. [It] is every bit as offensive to me as it is to the majority. [There is no criticism by the majority of this law] to which I cannot subscribe—except their conclusion that the evil qualities they see in the law make it unconstitutional.” What legal doctrines are involved here? Why did Justice Black distinguish between his personal views on the statute and the power of the Court to overturn it?

What We Offer: 

100% Original Paper

On-Time Delivery Guarantee

Automatic Plagiarism Check

100% Money-Back Guarantee

100% Privacy and Confidentiality

24/7 Support Service

Save Your Time for More Important Things! 

Let a professional tutor with over 10+ years’ experience writes a custom paper for you on this topic

find the cost of your paper