Annotated Bibliography: Arabian Women

Annotated Bibliography: Arabian Women

Dodd, Peter. 1973. “Family Honor and the Forces of Change in Arab Society.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 4(1): 40-54.

The journal article by Dodd (1973) tries to explain the place of family in the Arabian society. The author asserts that the discussions surrounding the family issue have been focusing mainly on the structures of authority within the family. Furthermore, he writes that women are usually secluded from the important discussions that involve their contribution to the well-being of the family as well as the society. As such, the role of women in the family is to offer satisfaction to the husbands and do the housework. Additionally, the virtues of women and the need to treat them respectfully are not much considered in the Arabic society. However, the ird dictates that the husband should be modest to his wife and is not responsible for punishing her by death in the case of mistakes.  Instead, the father of the woman should take the corrective measures on his daughter by ird principles.

Sakr, Naomi. 2008. “Women and Media in Saudi Arabia: Rhetoric, Reductionism, and Realities.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 35(3): 385-404.

Sakr (2008) explores the exclusion of women in the Arabic context in major decision making as well as development projects. The author is particularly disturbed by the fact that the women have been featuring in the media more often with time. Notably, the study covers the period between 2004 and 2006 when women began appearing in larger numbers in the media houses. Nevertheless, this public presence was not reflected in their professions and social settings. The women are still being denied promotion opportunities at the expense of cultural and religious practices where men are always given preference in all matters. Additionally, the women are not allowed to engage in active politics. However, there has been a recent breakthrough in negotiating the rights of all citizens in the Saudi Arabian kingdom so as to allow more flexibility in handling national issues in a more inclusive manner.

Doumato, Eleanor Abdella and Posusney, Marsha Pripstein. 2003. “Women and Globalization in the Arab Middle East: Gender, Economy, and Society.” Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Doumato and Posusney (2003) highlight the influence of globalization and economic expansion on the women in the Middle East. The effects of the changes in economic structures and international relations on the women have been both positive and negative on the women, but largely favor men. For instance, the ownership of land and other assets in the Middle East is perceived to men only affair and the women were previously perceived to have no rights to ownership of any property. However, through international integration and inception of American standards in the Islamist nation, there have been significant changes in the Middle East regarding social welfare. For instance, more women are getting hired into formal employment and having the right to access education facilities even abroad. Additionally, women in the Middle East have been bearing fewer children unlike in the past years.

Elimam, Haga, Abdullah Lobna, Al-Banawi Nisreen, and Bokhari Abla. 2014. “The Contribution of the Saudi Woman in Economic Development.” International Journal of Business & Economic Development 2(3): 60-67.

Elimam et al. (2014) conducted a quantitative study in Saudi Arabia to study whether there was any relationship between empowerment of women and economic development. The empowerment factor was measured using literacy of the women as well as their number in the formal labor market. Economic development was measured using the gross domestic product (GDP) of the country. Their study found that there was a strong positive relationship between the number of women getting into formal employment and the growth of GDP. This implied that the more the women were getting employed, the higher the growth of the GDP. Similarly, there was a relatively strong positive relationship between the literacy levels of Saudi women and the increase in GDP. These results imply that when the Saudi women are subjected to quality education and involved in economic activities through formal employment, the Kingdom will thrive.

Al Rashedi, Noura, AlShamsi Abdullah, Rashed Mohamed, Sinczak Tomasz, Hodgson Sasha, and O’Neil Kate. 2015. “Social Marketing, Education and the Female Workforce: A Comparison of United Arab Emirates and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” Middle East Journal of Business 10(1): 39-49.

Al Rashedi et al. (2015) claims that the life of women in the UAE is dependent on the status of religious affiliation, economic class, and the political activities at any given time. The authors acknowledge that globalization has played a pivotal role in liberating women from the cultural bondages that are often unjustified and perceived to be a violation of basic human rights. This is because the country is expanding its economy by allowing foreigners to work there, thereby allowing the gradual changes in social life. As a result, the government has relaxed some of the strict laws and allowed women to open up small and medium enterprises and contribute to the anticipated growth. However, this achievement has been triggered by political and official reforms that have expanded access to education for women leading to substantial growth.

Sivakumar, Abirami Devi and Sarkar, Siddhartha. 2012. “Women Entrepreneurs in Small and Medium Scale Businesses in Saudi Arabia.” International Journal of Finance & Policy Analysis 4(1): 25-32.

Sivakumar and Sarkar (2012) explore challenges that women entrepreneurs face in the United Arab Emirates. They point out that inadequate capital, lack of enough expertise to conduct businesses, and social discrimination are the major problems the businesswomen encounter in the country. Nevertheless, the women can access startup capital through credit facilities and acquire the relevant knowledge and skills through higher education, training in seminars, and guidance by government experts. Additionally, the chamber of commerce plays a vital role in ensuring that the businesses set up by the women thrive through encouraging participation in business women center.

 

 

References

Al Rashedi, Noura, AlShamsi Abdullah, Rashed Mohamed, Sinczak Tomasz, Hodgson Sasha, and O’Neil Kate. 2015. “Social Marketing, Education and the Female Workforce: A Comparison of United Arab Emirates and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” Middle East Journal of Business 10(1): 39-49.

Dodd, Peter. 1973. “Family Honor and the Forces of Change in Arab Society.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 4(1): 40-54.

Dodd, Peter. 1973. “Family Honor and the Forces of Change in Arab Society.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 4(1): 40-54.

Doumato, Eleanor Abdella and Posusney, Marsha Pripstein. 2003. “Women and Globalization in the Arab Middle East: Gender, Economy, and Society.” Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Elimam, Haga, Abdullah Lobna, Al-Banawi Nisreen, and Bokhari Abla. 2014. “The Contribution of the Saudi Woman in Economic Development.” International Journal of Business & Economic Development 2(3): 60-67.

Sakr, Naomi. 2008. “Women and Media in Saudi Arabia: Rhetoric, Reductionism, and Realities.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 35(3): 385-404.

Sivakumar, Abirami Devi and Sarkar, Siddhartha. 2012. “Women Entrepreneurs in Small and Medium Scale Businesses in Saudi Arabia.” International Journal of Finance & Policy Analysis 4(1): 25-32.

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