British Foreign Policy Since 1815

British Foreign Policy Since 1815

The British Foreign Policy of 1815 was characterized by war weariness, especially in Britain and France. Back in the history, the French Wars resulted for almost twenty-two years where only Britain only opposed the most powerful nation, that is, the France. The experts in this field of international diplomacy normally argue that Britain as a country applied various skills to ensure that they won these wars as they tried to ensure sustainability in their economic, social and political powers across the globe during that time. During that time, most European Nations were defeated by the French Armies during wars. Others ended up signing peace treaties to ensure peaceful coexistence with France for economic and political prosperity (Chambrlain 1989). The Britain Wars estimated costs were approximately 600 million Euros. Hence, Britain as a country had to make very important considerations related to the economic conditions of the country. This means that the country had to lay various strategies that would lead to trade survival during the war and after the war. Most of the British colonies were a good source of raw materials for their industries specializing in manufacturing. This also provided invisible earnings that channeled both the banking and the insurance sectors in the economy. Additionally, this provided a way of managing the vast amounts of the incoming cash from the different sectors of the economy. However, after 1830, ‘Workshop World’ required Britain as a country needed a source of raw materials for their manufacturing sector as well as a market for the manufactured goods. Therefore, it needed to maintain various colonies to ensure a constant supply for all these factors. Hence, the country had to apply various skills and strategies to ensure this as discussed below:

To start with, Britain had to come up with strategies that would enable it to defeat France which was the most dangerous country and a major threat to its economy. Hence, Britain had to ensure that it had strengthened its military. This would ensure successful activities during the times of war. This meant strengthening the Royal Navy and Wellington Army, especially during the peninsular campaign. A strong military ensured that they remained strong and resilient against the French Armies as it protected the Britain borders and those of its colonies in different parts of the world. During this time, a strong army was important in the acquisition of new colonies in different continents (Goodlad 2000). This was important for Britain as it ensured that it gained access and supply of raw materials for its industries. Additionally, the acquired colonies provided a ready market for the finished goods produced in the country. Thus, a strong military was an important factor and a principle to strengthen the British policy during this time. The government had to ensure that it applied all measures and resources to strengthen its army to enhance its sustainability which would lead to success during wars and in protecting the country against its rivals and enemies especially the France. Adequate training and provision of necessary resources ensured that the army had the skills required in the battlefields when fighting with their enemies.

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