Why does Schwitzegebel think that the external world is better known to us than our own phenomenal experience?

Why does Schwitzegebel think that the external world is better known to us than our own phenomenal experience?.

Schwitzegebel think that the external world is better known

1.Why does Schwitzegebel think that the external world is better known to us than our own phenomenal experience?
2. Schwitzgebel holds that we are bad at accessing both immediate phenomenal experience and bad at assessing our own beliefs, desires, intentions, and character. What evidence does he have for this?
3. If what Schwitzgebel holds is true, what does that say about individualist epistemology and epistemology whose foundation is found in our sensory experience?
4. Why does Wegner think that there is an illusion of conscious will?
5. Why does Wegner hold that we have, at best, poor access to our intentions?
6. If what Wegner says is true, what is the implication for epistemology? Is it merely a rebuke of the epistemology of self-knowledge, or does it imply a wider problem for knowledge?
7. In general (i.e. not limited to the case of white ignorance), what does Mills mean by structural, group-based miscognition. Make sure your answer covers every part of that term!
8. What is the difference between prescriptive and descriptive epistemology? Give an example of each.
9. What does Mills mean when he says his epistemology is veritistic? Why does he consider this important for the purposes of critique?
10. Mills says that individualistic epistemology is responsible for hiding certain problems of knowledge. Which problems, and why and how does individualistic epistemology hide them?
11. Mills holds that there is a special form of "white ignorance." What does he mean by that? Is it limited to white people? If not, why is it called "white ignorance"?
12. Besides the mathematical reason, why is it that the people in the lowest quartile were most susceptible to mis-apprehending their skill level? What does that tell us about cognition, knowledge, and self-knowledge.
13. Dunning and Kruger hypothesize that the self-overestimation of the skills of the bottom quartile and the self-underestimation of the top quartile are due to different reasons. What are those reasons and what does that difference tell us about cognitive biases, epistemology, and self-knowledge?
14. How does social intelligence figure into the Dunning Kruger effect? Think about how Kruger and Dunning talk about "how the incompetent fail, through life experience, to learn that they are unskilled."
15. In what sorts of skills are people least likely to be victims of the Dunning Kruger effect, and why?
16. What does Loftus and Laney’s (and many other researchers’) work on false memory effects tell us about social constructed knowledge?
17. Thinking especially of what Mills wrote on "white ignorance": how can false memory serve existing power structures, and why is it more likely to serve those structures than to work against them?
18. According to the research they cite, Loftus and Laney show that memory isn’t just fallible, but rather that we are prone to strongly believe and develop elaborate narratives around events that did not occur. If this is the case, what does that say about the basis of most of our knowledge?

 

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Why does Schwitzegebel think that the external world is better known to us than our own phenomenal experience?

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