Charismatic leadership

Charismatic leadership.

Charismatic leadership

  1. Question

Charismatic leadership may lead to a disaster especially when the leader lacks other leadership traits such as integrity and competence. The actions of a leader can trigger a reaction among their followers, without taking into consideration if the results will be beneficial or harmful. Yukl defines charisma as the “follower perceptions that a leader possesses exceptional qualities” (Yukl 312). The followers are over confident in the leader’s ability and this may lead to denial of failure. Some of the followers suffering from fear, guilt or alienation may experience “euphoric empowerment” by submerging their identity into that of their leader (Yukl 315). Such followers treat their leaders as a seemingly superhuman who is less likely to make mistakes, and they desire to please and imitate their leader.

  1. Question

George Patton, a former US military general, displayed charismatic leadership when he led the US army during the world war. Coming from a military family, Patton was a feared general, and the soldiers admired his braveness and behavior during the war (Sanderson 17). He was a strict disciplinarian and demanding leader and soldiers had absolute confidence in his ability to secure their safety. Due to his aggressive approach in the battlefield, Patton won the soldier’s trust, respect and loyalty and he did not hesitate to make tough decisions to secure the troop’s safety. Patton’s through knowledge of the science of war assured the soldiers of their survival during the horrors of war.

  1. Question

Patton’s aggressive nature caused the soldiers to act in a manner that they did not differentiate right or wrong. An example is when he gave a strongly worded speech to the troops, motivating them to massacre 73 unarmed German and Italian soldiers who were prisoners of war (Kennedy 169). The soldiers acted in a way meant to please the general and did not consider the consequences of their actions. Also, Patton was not sympathetic to soldiers who contradicted his directions especially those that he viewed as cowards. On one occasion, he slapped two soldiers injured on the battlefield and was undergoing treating at a hospital. Despite being asked to apologize for his mistakes, he explained the reasons for his actions, and he was not in any way convinced he erred.

  1. Question

George Patton’s charisma can be described using the self-concept theory. Due to Patton’s extensive knowledge in the science of war, the troops willingly followed his leadership as the best way to survive the war. Due to his past victories, the soldiers were inclined to perform their best and follow Patton’s direction at the war front. During the World War, Germans feared Patton due to his aggressive nature and that of the troops under him. A leader who is confident and enthusiastic can influence the mood of the followers, therefore increasing their enthusiasm and perception that they can achieve tough objectives. The troops were motivated to ensure the success of their missions as a way of surviving the war. In addition, George Patton took personal risks in the war that led to losing his military powers because he went overboard in achieving success.

  1. Question

Charismatic leadership can only evolve into transformational leadership in the presence of other leadership traits such as integrity and competence. Transactional leadership aims at inspiring factions by alluring to their self-interest whereas transformational leadership entreaties to the decent values of supporters as a raising consciousness about ethical issues.

  1. Question

Yukl explains that followers who are confused and anxious about their life tend to support a strong leader with a personalized power approach who can provide them a clear identity as loyal supporters (Yukl 318). The loyalty of the troops to General Patton was due to psychodynamic processes since they saw him as their only hope for surviving the war. Under the charismatic leadership of Patton, the troops were confident to concur the enemy and secure their survival.

 

 

 

Works Cited

Kennedy, David. The American People in World War II: Freedom from Fear, Part Two. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. Document.

Sanderson, Major Jeffrey. General George S.Patton Jr.: Master of Operational Battle Command. What Lasting Battle Command Lessons can we Learn from Him. Monograph. Kansas: School of Advanced Military Studies, 1997. Document.

Yukl, Gary. Leadership in Organizations. Albany: Pearson Education, 2012. Online Edition.

 

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Charismatic leadership

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