Everyday use by Alice Walker

Everyday use by Alice Walker

ENGLISH 1102 / Ms. E-Z / LITERARY ESSAY #1

 

Your task for this assignment is to write a thesis-based essay about one of the stories we have read together in class. You will find the guidelines for this essay on Blackboard. Here are some additional clarifications:

 

  • You must select one of the stories we have read together in class.
  • You must generate an ORIGINAL thesis about this story.
  • Your essay must contain at least four body paragraphs, each of which contains a point in support of your thesis.
  • Each body paragraph must be fully developed with (a) discussion and (b) clear examples and/or quotes from the story.
  • You must use ONE secondary source, cited and/or quoted in the paper.
  • Your essay must include a Works Cited page with the primary and secondary sources listed in alphabetical order.
  • Your essay must contain one or two short quotes and one block quote
  • You must quote from your primary source (the story) as well as from your secondary source (a scholarly analysis of the story)
  • Your essay must be submitted in proper MLA format.
  • Your essay must be ERROR-FREE.
  • You must sustain present tense/active voice throughout your essay.
  • Your essay must NOT use the first person (“I”) or second person (“you”).
  • Your essay must be an example of your VERY BEST writing, and must demonstrate mastery of analytical writing skills.

 

 

Below you will find a “skeleton outline” to help you structure your paper:

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH 1102 / MS. E-Z / LITERARY ESSAY SKELETON OUTLINE

 

  1. Introduction: 6-7 sentences
    1. “Hook”: a colorful, thought-provoking sentence or quote related to your topic (1 sentence)
    2. Explanation/follow-up: pick up from your hook and connect it to your topic and the work you are discussing (2-3 sentences)
    3. Provide relevant background information about the story and topic/thesis (2-3 sentences)
    4. THESIS STATEMENT: a single declarative sentence in which you present your claim about the story (1 sentence)
    5. CLINCHER: Close your paragraph, either by elucidating your thesis statement, saying why it’s important or interesting, or providing other “food for thought.” (1 sentence)

 

  1. Body paragraph / POINT #1 (6-7 sentences)
    1. TOPIC SENTENCE: a single declarative sentence at the beginning of the paragraph, usually the first sentence, that MAKES A POINT relating to the thesis
    2. EXPLANATION: (2-3 sentences): Explain the topic sentence and point your are making; connect it to your thesis
    3. DETAILS, EVIDENCE, EXAMPLES (3-4 sentences):

Present concrete examples from the story to illustrate the point and/or include a quote from the story to illustrate the point

  1. CLINCHER (1-2 sentences): Return to the point you made at the beginning of the paragraph, and link it back to your thesis.

 

  • Body paragraph / POINT #2 (6-7 sentences):
    1. TRANSITION AND TOPIC SENTENCE (1-2 sentences)
    2. EXPLANATION: (2-3 sentences):
    3. DETAILS, EVIDENCE, EXAMPLES (3-4 sentences)
    4. CLINCHER (1-2 sentences)

 

  1. Body paragraph / POINT #3 (6-7 sentences):
    1. TRANSITION AND TOPIC SENTENCE (1-2 sentences)
    2. EXPLANATION: (2-3 sentences):
    3. DETAILS, EVIDENCE, EXAMPLES (3-4 sentences)
    4. CLINCHER (1-2 sentences)

 

  1. Body paragraph / POINT #4 (6-7 sentences):
    1. TRANSITION AND TOPIC SENTENCE (1-2 sentences)
    2. EXPLANATION: (2-3 sentences):
    3. DETAILS, EVIDENCE, EXAMPLES (3-4 sentences)
    4. CLINCHER

 

  1. CONCLUSION (6-7 sentences)
    1. Tie all points together (1-2 sentences)
    2. Return to thesis and confirm it (1-2 sentences)
    3. Discuss important conclusions reached (2-4 sentences)
    4. Leave the reader with “food for thought” (1-2 sentences)
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