In your future careers and fields of study, you are likely to encounter a variety of primary source material. This material may include film, images, tax records, handwritten notes, charts, spreadsheets, and interviews.

Film, images, tax records, handwritten notes, charts, spreadsheets, and interviews

1.Read the article Unreliable Research: Trouble at the Lab, which explains some of the more nuanced details of the problems within quantitative data—namely, statistics and experiment replicability. In this week’s discussion, describe the main points of the article that you found most profound. Is there really a serious problem with data reporting, or is this something we are overanalyzing? What do you think makes quantitative research so powerful?

In response to your peers, answer the following: How did they answer differently than you? Are there any examples in your own life you could use to help make arguments for or against your classmates’ claims?

Review and revise your literature review for final submission. It should be a complete, polished artifact containing all of the critical elements of the final product. It should reflect the incorporation of feedback gained throughout the course.

2.In your future careers and fields of study, you are likely to encounter a variety of primary source material. This material may include film, images, tax records, handwritten notes, charts, spreadsheets, and interviews.

At the U.S. National Archives Doc Teach site, you will participate in a “Weighing the Evidence” activity. From the perspective of a social scientist, this experience will allow you to make value assessments on which primary sources are most useful and why.

You will submit a short paper that explains the criteria you used to rank the sources. Include specific examples of how sources might be used in research. Identify a secondary source that would effectively supplement the primary resources, providing different information.

3. Submit a draft of the Research Question and Ethical Considerations (Section II) and Methodology (Section III) including all critical elements as listed in the Final Project Two Document. You will deconstruct your research question into its important sections, and explain the significance of your research. The draft should include the implications, data collection methods, and expected relationship. In addition, you will clearly explain the steps you will take to reach a research conclusion. Your methodology should be clearly stated and include the sample size and analysis of the data. This draft should be as detailed as possible to allow the instructor to provide significant feedback to improve the final submission of your research proposal.

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