Reflect on whether or not the prevalence of HIV cases might be attributed to increased complacency due to more advanced drug treatment options for HIV/AIDS.

Prevalence of HIV

While HIV/AIDS is still currently incurable, the prognosis for patients with this infectious disease has improved due to advancements in drug treatments. Consider the case of Kristy Aney. Kristy was diagnosed with HIV in 1992 and was told she would survive, at most, 10 more years. Despite unfavorable odds, Kristy is still alive 20 years later. Since her diagnosis, she has witnessed tremendous improvements in HIV/AIDS treatments which have helped patients live longer with fewer side effects. While she acknowledges that these drug treatments have kept her alive, she fears that improvements in drug therapy have led to more people becoming complacent about the disease (Idaho Statesmen, 2012). In fact, the number of people living with HIV/AIDS in the United States is higher than it has ever been (CDC, 2012). This poses the question: Is there a relationship between drug advancements, societal complacency, and infection?

To prepare:

  • Review Chapter 49 of the Arcangelo      and Peterson text, as well as the Krummenacher et al. and Scourfield      articles in the Learning Resources.
  • Reflect on whether or not the      prevalence of HIV cases might be attributed to increased complacency due      to more advanced drug treatment options for HIV/AIDS.
  • Consider how health care      professionals can help to change perceptions and make people more aware of      the realities of the disease.
  • Think about strategies to educate HIV      positive patients on medication adherence, as well as safe practices to      reduce the risk of infecting others.

With these thoughts in mind:

Post an explanation of whether or not you think the prevalence of HIV cases might be attributed to increased complacency due to more advanced drug treatment options. Then, explain how health care professionals can help to change perceptions and increase awareness of the realities of the disease. Finally, describe strategies to educate HIV positive patients on medication adherence, as well as safe practices to reduce the risk of infecting others.

This work should have Introduction and conclusion

– This work should have at 3 to 5current references (Year 2012 and up)

– Use at least 2 references from class Learning Resources

The following Resources are not acceptable:

1. Wikipedia

2. Cdc.gov- nonhealthcare professionals section

3. Webmd.com

4. Mayoclinic.com

Required Readings

Arcangelo, V. P., Peterson, A. M., Wilbur, V., & Reinhold, J. A. (Eds.). (2017). Pharmacotherapeutics for advanced practice: A practical approach (4th ed.). Ambler, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • Chapter 8, “Principles of      Antimicrobial Therapy” (pp. 111-134)
    This chapter covers factors that impact the selection of an antimicrobial      treatment regimen. It also examines the clinical uses, adverse events, and      drug interactions of various antimicrobial agents such as penicillin.
  • Chapter 12, “Fungal Infections      of the Skin” (pp. 163-196)
    This chapter explores the pathophysiology of several fungal infections of      the skin as well as related drug treatments and examines the importance of      patient education when managing these infections.
  • Chapter 14, “Bacterial      Infections of the Skin” (pp. 181-196)
    This chapter begins by examining causes of bacterial infections. It then      explores the importance of selecting an appropriate agent for treating      bacterial infections.
  • Chapter 32, “Urinary Tract      Infection” (pp. 519-526)
    This chapter covers drugs used to treat urinary tract infections and      identifies special considerations when treating geriatric patients,      pediatric patients, and women.
  • Chapter 35, “Sexually      Transmitted Infections” (pp. 512-535)
    This chapter outlines the causes, pathophysiology, and drug treatment of      six sexually transmitted infections, including gonorrhea, syphilis, and      human papilloma virus infection (HPV). It also examines the importance of      selecting the proper agent and monitoring patient response to treatment.
  • Chapter 49, “Human Immunodeficiency Virus” (pp.      843-860)
    This chapter presents the causes, pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria,      and prevention methods for HIV. It also covers various methods of drug      treatment and patient factors to consider when selecting, administering,      and managing drug treatments.

Krummenacher, I., Cavassini, M., Bugnon, O., & Schneider, M. (2011). An interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program combining motivational interviewing and electronic antiretroviral drug monitoring. AIDS Care, 23(5), 550–561.

This article analyzes medication adherence in HIV patients and examines factors that increase adherence as well as factors that contribute to termination or discontinuation of treatment.

Drugs.com. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.drugs.com/

This website presents a comprehensive review of prescription and over-the-counter drugs including information on common uses and potential side effects. It also provides updates relating to new drugs on the market, support from health professionals, and a drug-drug interactions checker.

Scourfield, A., Waters, L., & Nelson, M. (2011). Drug combinations for HIV: What’s new? Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy, 9(11), 1001–1011.

Note: Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

This article examines current therapies and strategies for treating HIV patients. It also examines factors that impact selection of therapy, including drug interactions, personalization of therapy, costs, management of comorbidities, and patient response.

Required Media

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2012). Antimicrobials. Baltimore, MD: Author.

This media presentation outlines principles of antimicrobial therapy 

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 7 minutes.

Mayer, K. H., & Krakower, D. (2012). Antiretroviral medication and HIV prevention: New steps forward and New Questions. Annals of Internal Medicine, 156(4), 312–314.

find the cost of your paper