When Should Mixed Methods Be Used?

When Should Mixed Methods Be Used?

Topic—  Bullying             Topic— Bullying

Prior to beginning work on this discussion, read Chapters 1 and 2 of the Hesse-Biber e-book, Mixed Methods Research: Merging Theory with Practice, and the two required articles for this week. Mixed methods is a current popular methodology. While this type of methodology is useful for some studies, because of its dual nature as both quantitative and qualitative, it is not effective or appropriate for all research.

For this discussion, you will consider the use of mixed methods for the topic, (BULLYING), you have chosen for your Research Proposal. In your initial post, apply the scientific method to your research topic by defining your research question and determining the method(s) necessary to answer that question. Compare the characteristics and appropriate uses of the different methods and explain if your research question could best be answered through qualitative or quantitative methods, or a mix of both. Identify the dominant method (quantitative or qualitative) for your proposed study. Explain whether or not a mixed methods approach is the best way to study the topic, demonstrating that the second method is not added as an afterthought or merely to impress journal editors who favor mixed methods. If you have decided not to use mixed methods, explain why the study is best completed with either a quantitative or qualitative focus. Justify your design choice and support your position with scholarly sources. Include a discussion explaining how you would apply ethical principles to your design to address concerns which may impact your research.

 

E-Book

Hesse-Biber, S. N. (2010). Mixed methods research: Merging theory with practice. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

  • Chapter 1: Introduction to Mixed Methods Research
  • Chapter 2: Formulating Questions, Conducting a Literature Review, Sampling Design, and the Centrality of Ethics in Mixed Methods Research
  • The full-text version of this e-book is available through the ebrary database in the Ashford University Library. The database that houses this resource allows for online reading. Please be aware that checking this item out of the library may prevent other users from accessing it.

Articles

Bryman, A. (2006). Integrating quantitative and qualitative research: How is it done? Qualitative Research, 6(1), 97-113. doi:10.1177/1468794106058877

  • The full-text version of this article can be accessed through the Sage Journals database in the Ashford University Library. The author of this article presents a variety of mixed methods research designs, which are classified according to the answers to five questions.

Fetters, M. D., Curry, L. A., & Creswell, J. W. (2013). Achieving integration in mixed methods designs – principles and practices. Health Services Research, 48(6), 2134-2156. doi:10.1111/1475-6773.12117

  • The full-text version of this article can be accessed through the EBSCOhost database in the Ashford University Library. Integration of qualitative and quantitative methods within a study can occur at one or more of three levels (design, methods, and interpretation/reporting). The authors of this article discuss how integration is achieved in several different mixed methods research designs.
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