Consider these questions: Is this sexual harassment? If Britt really intends no harm/nothing sexual, does that change your opinion about whether it is or isn’t harassment?

Consider these questions: Is this sexual harassment? If Britt really intends no harm/nothing sexual, does that change your opinion about whether it is or isn’t harassment?

OPTION 1: Respond to the following scenario: Britt and Pam work in a mental health facility that provides inpatient and outpatient services. Although Britt and Pam were once colleague counselors, Britt was promoted a couple years ago making him Pam’s supervisor. In spite of the change in position, Pam and Britt remained friendly and occasionally had lunch together. One day, Britt comes up behind Pam while she is working at her desk. He begins massaging her shoulders and she looks distressed. He also calls her “Sweetie” while giving her the massage. Pam doesn’t tell him to stop or express her discomfort with Britt’s massage.

Consider these questions: Is this sexual harassment? If Britt really intends no harm/nothing sexual, does that change your opinion about whether it is or isn’t harassment? What do you think about Britt calling Pam “Sweetie”? Is it an example of sexual harassment? If Britt was still Pam’s colleague and not her supervisor would his behavior be considered sexual harassment? What steps should Pam take in dealing with Britt (list)? If you observed the massage, what would you do? Explain. If you were another supervisor, on Britt’s level, what would you do?

References:
Balswick, J., & Balswick, J. (2008). Authentic human sexuality: An integrated Christian approach. Downers Grove, IL: Intervarsity Press. ISBN: 9780830828838.

McIlhaney, J., & McKissic Bush, F. (2008). Hooked: New science on how casual sex is affecting our children. Chicago, IL: Northfield. ISBN: 9780802450609

Balswick & Balswick: chs. 11–12

McIlhaney & McKissic Bush: ch. 1-3

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