An Ounce Of Cure

An Ounce Of Cure

Follow the directions below to find a topic and brainstorm, and then write an essay of approximately 1000-1500 words (3-4 pages typed, double-spaced). Develop your thoughts first through pre-writing and informal outlining before starting your first draft. Keep in mind your audience (classmates) and purpose (argue your interpretation). Analyzing literature is a form of argument. The position you take will be your thesis. The purpose of your paper will be to explain, defend, and prove the truth of your thesis, using your own thoughts along with evidence from the story. e sure to mention the story title and author in your introductory paragraph and follow Modern Language Association (MLA) documentation guidelines to format your paper and to include in-text citations and a Works cited page at the end. Complete a final draft and turn it in with all of your pre-writing and <link is hidden> Writing <link is hidden> one of the short stories that we read as a class. Select the story that resonated the most with you, the one that made you feel <link is hidden> a second reading of the story and annotate passages that strike you, either in the margins of the story or on paper/index cards. Underline or circle words, phrases, and sentences that stood out for you. Write questions, comments, or reactions. If you can, make connections to what you’ve read or <link is hidden> over your annotations. List the most powerful thoughts and impressions the text inspires in <link is hidden> your list. Identify your most intense point of response and brainstorm (freewrite, cluster, create lists or a chart) for potential topics. Below are some ideas that focus on the craft of fiction and how different elements help to contribute to the story’s theme:•Analyze how an author creates/presents the characters in the story. How does the writer reveal who these people are? How are they brought to life? Look for specific examples where the author uses techniques like vivid physical description, dialogue, actions, anecdotal background, and reactions of others. What kind of people are they? How do they behave? What are their values? What kinds of emotions do they display? Do you think the writer portrays the characters objectively? How do these characters contribute to the story’s meaning and persuasiveness?
•Analyze an author’s language, tone, and style. This would include sentence structure, word choice, and figurative language (imagery, metaphors, and similes). If you like, you might also consider the use of symbols. A symbol is a person, place, thing, or event that suggests or signifies something beyond itself. You could look at the tone, which is his or her attitude toward the people, settings, and events in the story and towards the reader. For example, it could be sympathetic, humorous, serious, detached, or critical. How does the author’s writing style contribute to the story’s meaning and persuasiveness?•Describe the point of view of a story. Who tells the story? Explain why this angle of vision seems right and fitting to the telling of this story. How does it shape the theme of the story?•Analyze setting in a story. How does setting (time and place) function in the story? Does the setting supply atmosphere? Make things happen? Reveal the natures of certain people? Prompt a character to a realization? Help to convey the theme?•Create a topic that rises out of your journaling. Make sure that it lends itself to analysis and interpretation. Check in with me <link is hidden> a working thesis that states the topic of your paper. This will be your interpretive argument, the WHAT of your paper. Make sure it’s specific, limited, and <link is hidden> a discovery (first, rough) draft of your essay, showing HOW the writer accomplishes the WHAT. Use some summary, paraphrasing, and quotations to support your points. To close your essay, don’t just summarize what you’ve already covered, but give some thought as to WHY the author might have written the story in this way or why your topic is <link is hidden> the rest of the writing process we’ve discussed in class: get peer feedback, write a final draft, edit and proofread, and follow MLA <link is hidden> Essay

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