Japan and America – Cultural Constructions that Complicate Interracial Dating

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Term Paper Instructions and Template

I. Embedded Writing-Intensive Experience expectations for the research paper
A. Students should be able to produce:
1. a title page
2. an introduction containing:
a. background information on the research topic and explaining why the
topic is important.
b. a clear, precise thesis statement or statements which, together, clarify the
thesis.
c. the use of the first person, i.e., “I.”
3. a body consisting of:
a. synthesized research.
b. coherent paragraph development and transitions between paragraphs.
c. at least one quotation.
d. mostly paraphrases of information.
e. proper documentation of sources for quotations and paraphrases.
i. Students are required to take and pass with a score of 90% or
better on the on-line plagiarism tutorial test provided by the
University of Southern Mississippi:
http://www.lib.usm.edu/legacy/plag/plagiarismtutorial.php
ii. The plagiarism tutorial must be taken within the first FOUR WEEKS
of the semester, print out immediately after completion, and save
to be turned in at the end of the semester with their presentation.
iii. Failure to submit and/or pass plagiarism tutorial with 90% or better
results in loss of 20 points/100.
4. a brief and logical conclusion.
5. a two-part bibliography in MLA (Modern Language Association) 8
th edition format.
a. I recommend students first consult the bibliography template below and
then consult the MLA citation guide
http://usi.libguides.com/content.php?pid=80760&sid=598742
and, especially, NoodleTools Express, the MLA recommended citation tool.
http://my.noodletools.com/noodlebib/express.php
b. The Bibliography will consist of:
i. a “Works Consulted” section
ii. a “Works Cited” section
B. Of course, grammar, spelling, and punctuation matter.
C. I URGE students to meet with the tutors in the USI Writer’s Room, Education Center,
Room 1102, to work on sentence structure, punctuation, clarity, and transitions
between sentences and between paragraphs, before submitting their first drafts.
Appointments with a Writing Consultant are available by calling (812) 461-5359.
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II. Select the paper topic.
A. Students pick a topic relevant to the class and approved by the professor.
1. Students might pick a micro-topic from one of the general categories of institutions
discussed in class, e.g., science, archeology/history, sports, religion, law,
society/family etc., or they might investigate one example of how gender or
gendered race or gendered class shape their disciplines in a specific way.
2. Students might also glean ideas from the books and topics from the list on the
syllabus some of which students used in previous classes.
a. Students will want to find more contemporary examples, of course, (with the
exception of McKinnon’s work on law and pornography—still a relevant
argument).
III. Narrow the research subject to a manageable topic.
A. For example, students may be interested in the broad topic of “intersexuality.” A
narrow topic could be researching if passports issued by the United States or by any
other country recognize this third biological sex.
B. For example, students are interested in the broad subject of gender and race in sports
but focus on a particular sport, in a particular context or timeframe, e.g., participation
and success-rates for girls or women of color in gymnastics at the U.S. Olympic-level.
C. For example, students are interested in the rights of rapists over the bodies of their
victims. Students could narrow the scope to a particular geographic area or practice,
e.g., finding out if male rapists have parental rights in Indiana or Kentucky over the
children that their female victims chose to bear.
D. For example, students interested in the broad subject of public monuments dedicated
to women narrow the scope of their research by examining a place, e.g., Chicago or
Washington D.C., or Detroit.
IV. Research the subject and write the term paper.
A. Students find scholarly or other reliable sources, e.g., from news organizations following
journalistic practices or on professional websites.
B. Students must use at least one scholarly article or book chapter.
1. Only use professional websites, e.g., AMA (American Medical Association).
2. Read some of the sources.
3. Create part I of the bibliography, i.e., a “works consulted” section.
4. Create a “works cited” section after selecting the sources you will cite.
C. Write the term paper.
1. Synthesize the information researched and convert the information into the
introduction and body portions of the essay.
2. Optional: consult sources for writing a good essay, e.g., Livingstone, Kathy. “Guide
to Writing a Basic Essay.” Guide to Writing a Basic Essay, Kathy Livingstone, 25
June 2012, http://lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/index.html. Accessed 3 Sept. 2018.
D. Create part II of the bibliography, i.e., a “works cited” section.
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V. Organization1 and writing2 of Term Paper
A. Introduction
1. Start your introduction by stating a problem, or a concern, or by describing a
situation, or a fact, or an issue, narrowing the focus of your topic and providing
evidence or information that demonstrates the importance of your topic. The
following is an example of an introduction.
In 2017, 2,000 people in Illinois suffered permanent brain damage from
severe head traumas resulting from motorcycle accidents (Wilbur 33). Because 80%,
i.e., 1,600 of them, were not wearing helmets (Illinois Motorcycle Statistics 1),
Families for Active Public Wellness (FAPW), a non-profit organization interested in
promoting safety for families engaged in adventurous activities occurring in public
places, worked with State Representative Deborah R. McGovern to introduce bill
HR189 which would have required motorcyclists to wear helmets (Wilbur 33-34). The
Illinois Road Warriors Club (IRWC), the largest motorcycle organization in the state
(boasting over 30,000 members), successfully lobbied against HR189. McGovern and
FAPW cited family and public safety concerns to support passage of the bill while the
Road Warriors, on the other hand, grounded their objections in concerns about
preserving individual freedom of choice (McGovern 11; IRWC).
a. Consult the following for writing an introduction:
http://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/CARS
B. Thesis Statement
1. Add your thesis statement to your introduction, i.e., explain what you will
demonstrate and prove. Your thesis and subsequent sentences will also indicate the
order of supporting themes you will discuss. FOR THIS CLASS, YOU WILL BOLD AND
UNDERLINE YOUR THESIS STATEMENT.
a. For this class, and in future, assume that there is no such thing as a thesis
statement that is “too specific.”
b. The following is an example of an introduction with a thesis statement:
In 2017, 200 people in Illinois suffered permanent brain damage from severe
head traumas resulting from motorcycle accidents (Wilbur 33). Because 80%, i.e.,
160 of them, were not wearing helmets (“Illinois Motorcycle Statistics” 1), Families
for Active Public Wellness (FAPW), a non-profit organization interested in
promoting safety for families engaged in adventurous activities occurring in public

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“Research Guides.” University of Southern California – USC, http://libguides.usc.edu/?b=s
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“Research Guides.” University of Southern California – USC, http://libguides.usc.edu/?b=s
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places, worked with State representative Deborah R McGovern to introduce bill
HR189 which would have required motorcyclists to wear helmets (Wilbur 33-34).
The Illinois Road Warriors Club (IRWC), the largest motorcycle organization in the
state (boasting over 30,000 members), successfully lobbied against bill
ZQ189.McGovern and FAPW cited public safety and tax-payer and county
budgetary concerns to support passage of the bill while the Road Warriors, on the
other hand, grounded their objections in concerns about preserving individual
freedom of choice and the safety-advantages of not wearing helmets for the
experienced riders who choose not to wear them (McGovern 11; IRWC). I will
summarize the arguments these two organizations made, reveal how
these organizations have large gender imbalances in their constituencies
and, citing T. S. Richard’s study on “social weight” and legislative
agendas, I will suggest that these imbalances framed the arguments for
and against bill HR189 as well as the legislative defeat of HR189.
c. Consulting the following resource for tips on writing a good thesis statement
is strongly recommended: https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-andtools/thesis-statements/
C. Body
1. All your paragraphs should match what the thesis statement says and should follow
in the order laid out in the thesis statement.
2. Make sure you have transition sentences in each paragraph to ensure the
paragraphs and ideas flow logically into one another.
3. Documentation:
a. Remember you must document all information, facts, AND IDEAS as well as
quotations. If you do not document your sources, you will be guilty of
plagiarism and will fail the assignment.
b. If you use more than three words from a source you must either quote or
paraphrase the source/information.
c. You must use in-text parenthetical references. Use the following as
templates as needed.
i. Example using a paraphrase: Braysmith raises the concern that art
historians and critics tend to think that the compelling visual splendor
of artworks should outweigh any misogynistic, social impact these
artworks may have (171-172).
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ii. Example using a quote: “The influence of Braysmith’s critiques of the
aforementioned areas of art historical methodology and art criticism
is comparable to the impact Panofsky, Adorno, and Chicago have had
on these fields, cumulatively (Nochlin 21).”
d. Because you will use more than one book or resource, you must cite, from
time to time, the names of the authors/sources on whom you are relying or
whom you are quoting.
e. When using more than one book or resource by the same authors, you
must abbreviate the titles of the books/resources in the parenthetical
references.
i. Example of more than one resource by the same authors:
Baca, Chicago, and Said all contend that Braysmith’s insights into the
ethical issues surrounding the creation of contemporary artworks as
well as the reception of historical pieces make her the leading art
historian of this or, perhaps, any era (Baca Revolutionary Postmodernists
2; Chicago Game-changing Feminists 1; Said Landmark
Critiques 3; Said Great Minds 1).
D. Conclusion
1. The conclusion should be between one and three sentences long and summarize
how you proved your thesis statement.
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[Title Page—Template]
“Title of paper”
[First draft or Final draft] Submitted to Professor Hilary A. Braysmith, Ph.D.
in partial fulfillment of GNDR 222.00 [either 1 (TR) or 2 (Weds.)]
by
Student’s Full First Name, Middle Initial, Full Surname
September 25/26, 2018 [put in the correct date]
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[Template for bibliography3 ERASE and move the next line up]
Bibliography
Works Consulted4
[the sources gathered and read during the research phase]
Articles
Adler, Mi’kasha. “Motorcycles and Families: Safety or ‘Freedom’” Public Safety and Civil Rights,
vol. 5, no. 4, 2017, pp. 486-499. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/412333333333.
Branson, Daniella, and Stephanie Malley. “Gendered Lobbying and Social Weight.” Political
Studies, vol. 31, no. 11, Nov. 2010, pp. 1505-1530. SAGE,
https://doi.org/10.1222/0821/0170840610380802.
Books
Richards, T. S.. Weighing in on the (Im)Balance: Social Weight and Legislative Agendas.
University of Indiana, 2016.
Websites
“Head Injuries Resulting from Motorcycle Accidents in the State of Illinois – History and
Impact.” Families for Active Public Wellness, Marjorie Kamala, 23 July 2018,
http://fapw.org/head-injuries/. Accessed 1 August 2018.
Livingstone, Kathy. “Guide to Writing a Basic Essay.” Guide to Writing a Basic Essay, Kathy
Livingstone, 25 June 2012, lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/index.html. Accessed 3 Sept.
2018.
Works Cited
[the sources paraphrased or quoted in the paper]
Articles
Branson, Daniella, and Stephanie Malley. “Gendered Lobbying and Social Weight.” Political
Studies, vol. 31, no. 11, Nov. 2010, pp. 1505-1530. SAGE,
https://doi.org/10.1222/0821/0170840610380802.
Books
Richards, T. S.. Weighing in on the Balance: Social Weight and Legislative Agendas. University of
Indiana, 2016.

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For this class, students will organize their sources alphabetically by category headings, e.g., articles, books, films,
interviews, newspapers, website, etc.
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For formatting your citations use NoodleTools Express, the MLA recommended citation tool:
http://my.noodletools.com/noodlebib/express.php
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Websites
“Head Injuries Resulting from Motorcycle Accidents in the State of Illinois – History and
Impact.” Families for Active Public Wellness, Marjorie Kamala, 23 July 2018,
http://fapw.org/head-injuries/. Accessed 1 August 2018.
Format the paper
A. Title page
B. Three pages of a double-spaced essay
C. Bibliography (two sections)
D. Add pagination
E. Attach plagiarism test by stapling it to the hard copy of the paper.
VI. Submit the paper three ways
A. Submit the paper via email as a word attachment one half hour before class starts.
a. In subject put: GNDR 001 (if TR section) or GNDR 002 (if Weds. Section)
B. Submit the paper via the same email with the text copied and pasted into the email with
the attachment.
C. Submit the paper as a hard copy with the plagiarism test stapled to it at the beginning of
class on the day it is due.

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