Application of Effective Leadership

INTRODUCTION


Leaders use leadership theories, styles, and techniques to shape their behavior, meet goals, and accommodate the external environment, follower characteristics, and their own personalities. In order to enhance your own effectiveness as a leader, you will choose a leader whose role has changed over time and apply your knowledge of leadership theory and practice, including the use of leadership effectiveness models and the use of power and influence, to evaluate the leader’s performance and to justify recommendations you make for leadership improvement.

REQUIREMENTS


No more than a combined total of 30% of the submission and no more than a 10% match to any one individual source can be directly quoted or closely paraphrased from sources, even if cited correctly. An originality report is provided when you submit your task that can be used as a guide.

You must use the rubric to direct the creation of your submission because it provides detailed criteria that will be used to evaluate your work. Each requirement below may be evaluated by more than one rubric aspect. The rubric aspect titles may contain hyperlinks to relevant portions of the course.

A. Observe a leader whose role and leadership behaviors have changed over time because of external circumstances or growth by doing the following:

Note: You may choose a leader from the literature, history, or personal experience.

1. Describe how and why the leader’s use of leadership theories (i.e., transactional and transformational), leadership styles (i.e., autocratic and participative), and power and influence changed from one role to the next.

a. Evaluate, using contingency theory, the effectiveness of the leader’s behaviors in each role within the context of tasks, follower characteristics, and organizational goals.

2. Justify a recommendation, using specific examples, of how the leader could have behaved differently within each role to be more effective.

B. Acknowledge sources, using APA-formatted in-text citations and references, for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.

C. Demonstrate professional communication in the content and presentation of your submission.

Remember to be specific in your articulation of response and address the roles of the leader as explained by DuBrin (chapter 1, pgs. 11 – 17) in the text. Those roles can include figurehead, spokesperson, negotiator, coach and motivator, team builder, team player, technical problem solver, entrepreneur, strategic planner, and executor. Although a specific number of roles is not required, a minimum of two should complete the task.

RUBRIC

LEADERSHIP THEORIES, STYLES, AND POWER AND INFLUENCE

NOT EVIDENT

A description of how and why the use of leadership theories (i.e., transactional and transformative), leadership styles (i.e., autocratic and participative), and power and influence changed from one role to the next is not provided.

APPROACHING COMPETENCE

The description of how and why the use of leadership theories (i.e., transactional and transformative), leadership styles (i.e., autocratic and participative), and power and influence changed from one role to the next is inappropriate in the context of the leader identified. The description does not illustrate the complexity of the interactions among the changes in roles and the changes in behaviors.

COMPETENT

The description of how and why the use of leadership theories (i.e., transactional and transformative), leadership styles (i.e., autocratic and participative), and power and influence changed from one role to the next is appropriate in the context of the leader identified. The description illustrates the complexity of the interactions among the changes in roles and the changes in behaviors.

EVALUATION OF LEADERSHIP EFFECTIVENESS

NOT EVIDENT

An evaluation of the effectiveness of leadership behaviors within each role and in the context of tasks, follower characteristics, and organizational goals is not provided.

APPROACHING COMPETENCE

The use of contingency theory to evaluate the effectiveness of leadership behaviors within each role and in the context of tasks, follower characteristics, and organizational goals is inappropriate based on the leader described.

COMPETENT

The use of contingency theory to evaluate the effectiveness of leadership behaviors within each role and in the context of tasks, follower characteristics, and organizational goals is appropriate based on the leader described.

BEHAVIORAL IMPROVEMENTS

NOT EVIDENT

A justification of a recommendation of how the leader could have behaved differently within each role to be more effective is not provided.

APPROACHING COMPETENCE

The justification of a recommendation of how the leader could have behaved differently within each role to be more effective is inappropriate in the context of the leadership behaviors described in part A1. The justification does not include enough examples to illustrate how the leader could have been more effective.

COMPETENT

The justification of a recommendation of how the leader could have behaved differently within each role to be more effective is appropriate in the context of the leadership behaviors described in part A1. The justification includes enough examples to illustrate how the leader could have been more effective.

APA SOURCES

NOT EVIDENT

The submission does not include in-text citations and references according to APA style for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.

APPROACHING COMPETENCE

The submission includes in-text citations and references for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized but does not demonstrate a consistent application of APA style.

COMPETENT

The submission includes in-text citations and references for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized and demonstrates a consistent application of APA style.

PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

NOT EVIDENT

Content is unstructured, is disjointed, or contains pervasive errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar. Vocabulary or tone is unprofessional or distracts from the topic.

APPROACHING COMPETENCE

Content is poorly organized, is difficult to follow, or contains errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar that cause confusion. Terminology is misused or ineffective.

COMPETENT

Content reflects attention to detail, is organized, and focuses on the main ideas as prescribed in the task or chosen by the candidate. Terminology is pertinent, is used correctly, and effectively conveys the intended meaning. Mechanics, usage, and grammar promote accurate interpretation and understanding.