Speech outline

OUTLINE TEMPLATE

INTRODUCTION:

Here you should write out the introduction. Label the required parts of the introduction as you compose it:

I. Attention Getter (This statement serves two functions: it catches listeners’ attention and tunes them into your topic. You may use a rhetorical question, a direct question, a humorous anecdote, a famous quotation, a hypothetical example, an actual example, a startling statistic, and so on.)

II. Listener Relevance (Once you have your listeners’ attention, you need to reveal why they should listen to this particular speech. How does this material affect them? Why should they care?)

III. Speaker Credibility (In this step, you need to let listeners know why they should listen to you in particular. How/Why do you know more about this topic than they do? You may have personal experience with the topic; you may have researched extensively; you may have written articles about the topic. The point is, let your listeners know at the outset that you know a good deal about the topic.)

IV. Thesis Statement (This one-sentence summary of your speech is formed by, first, combining the general purpose to inform, to persuade, to entertain, to introduce, and the specific purpose about what? Be sure to state your thesis quite clearly. If listeners miss this part, they will have difficulty following the rest of the speech.)

V. Preview (In this statement, alert your listeners to the main points of your speech. As with the thesis statement, be very clear so listeners can easily follow the organizational pattern of the speech.)

[connective/transition: Make sure your audience knows you are moving from the introduction into the first main point.]

BODY

I. One complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.

Listener Relevance Link: Develop your connection to the audience in one to two concrete sentences.

         A. subpoint (These supporting points help listeners understand your perspective. They learn why you stated               your main point in the way you did. Consider breadth, depth, and listener relevance as you support each               main point.) (Be sure to use hanging indents!!!)

                   1. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                            a. sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                            b. sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                   2. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

         B. subpoint (single sentence)

                   1. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                   2. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

         C. subpoint (single sentence)

[connective/transition: Create a connective to help the audience move from the first main point to the second.]

II. Here is another complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.

Listener Relevance Link: develop your connection to the audience in one to two sentences.

         A. subpoint (single sentence)

                   1. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                   2. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

         B. subpoint (single sentence)

                   1. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                   2. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                            a. sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                            b. sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                            c. sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                                     i. sub-sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                                     ii. sub-sub-sub-subpoint (single sentence)

                   3. sub-subpoint (single sentence)

[connective/transition: Make sure your audience knows you are moving to the conclusion.]

Use the same format from the first two main points to complete main point 3.

CONCLUSION

Here you write out the conclusion. Label the required parts as you compose them:

I. Thesis Restatement (You may simply use the Thesis statement from the introduction, changing it to past tense.)

II. Main Point Summary: (Remind listeners of the two to four main points about which you elaborated during the         speech.)

III. Clincher: (The clincher serves several functions: provides closure, ties back to the attention catcher, heightens speech to aid in retention, helps listeners remember….“Thank you” is NOT a clincher.)

WORKS CITED/BIBLIOGRAPHY

Here you list complete citations, in APA format, for the research materials you have used in your speech. Include your citations in the body of the outline as well.

*****Note: In the introduction and conclusion, you must have the exact main points in the exact order as depicted.  In the body of the speech, you do not have to have the exact number of sub-points, sub-sub-points, etc. as depicted here.  This template is to show you what the formatting should look like.