Effect of Concentration Variation on the Transmission, Absorption, and Emission Properties of Rhodamine B Solution

Title: Effect of Concentration Variation on the Transmission, Absorption, and Emission Properties of Rhodamine B Solution

Abstract

Fiber optic spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorption, transmission, and emission properties of solutions including varying concentrations of rhodamine B to Ethyl. The obtained measurements (i.e., counts measured by a spectrometer) for the absorption and transmission of light for the varying concentrations of rhodamine B to Ethyl were plotted to analyse the absorption/transmission spectra of each of our solutions. By analysing the absorption/transmission spectra, we attempted to determine the absorption constant of our rhodamine B solutions. Additionally, the obtained measurements for emission for our rhodamine B solutions were plotted to analyse the emission spectra of each of our solutions. By analyzing the emission spectra, we attempted to determine a relationship between the varying amplitude and peak shifts that were plotted for each of our solutions. Finally, by comparing the absorption/transmission spectra to the emission spectra for our rhodamine B solutions, we attempted to show that a Stokes Shift between the absorption and emission of light was present for the measurements obtained for our rhodamine B solutions. Introduction In general spectrophotometry is used to analyse the transmission, absorption, and emission of light passing through different media. As light propagates in a media, its intensity will be attenuated as it is absorbed. This relationship can be described as I=I0 exp −∝ 𝑧, where I is the final intensity of light, I0 is the initial intensity, z is the path length, and α is the attenuation constant. The transmittance, T, is determined by taking the ratio of the final intensity of light to the initial intensity and the absorbance, A, can then be found through the relation Eq1. A= -log (T) Using the resulting absorbance and knowing the concentration, c, of the rhodamine solution as well as the given cuvette length, b, (see figure 1)allows one to use the Beer-Lambert law to determine the molar absorption constant ϵ for Rhodamine B: Eq2. A = *b*c Figure 1

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