What Is Literature Review?

1 Literature Review Assignment

What Is Literature Review?

Literature Review is an essential part of any coherent scientific research. By doing literature review scholars, such as yourself, learn about the most recent trends, discoveries, theories, etc. from their colleagues in the scientific community. Doing proper research without proper literature review is not possible. What is the purpose? The purpose of literature review is to help you identify and understand credible theories and recent discoveries in your field or as they relate to your topic. As you know, science is an ongoing, never-ending, and progressive process so new information is created constantly and the old information is amended or rejected. So, the point is for you to (1) identify the most recent theories, discoveries, and discussions related to your topic, (2) identify problems that exist and find resources for solving those problems, (3) know how, and where, to do research and locate literature (i.e. Journal articles) using library databases and other internet resources, (3) analyze information found in scientific journal articles, (4) synthesize new knowledge into written format, (5) and establish context for your inquiries (why is it important?). What steps do you have to take? 1. By this time in the course, you should have a research topic to focus both your Literature Review and your final paper on. If you have not, you still have time, but you must be quick! 2. Go to the http://library.csusb.edu (Library dot CSUSB dot EDU). 3. Make sure you are using the proper database (EbscoHost, PyschInfo, etc.) and look for peerreviewed journal articles. 4. Pick between 4 to 6 journal articles that are related to your field of study, or interest. 5. Skim the abstract and the intro. If it is related to your topic continue to step 6. If it is not related to your topic go back to step 2. 6. Read your articles and classify them, or sort them, according to findings, theories, for or against an argument, etc. (sort them in whatever meaningful way they make sense to you!). 7. Write an outline for your lit review. 8. Write your review. 9. Read your review. 10. Revise your review. 11. If you are satisfied with your literature review turn it in. If you are not satisfied with your review, go to step 9. (This idea of go to this step or that step when certain conditions are met (or not met) in general is known as Algorithm and this is how it looks like.) Outline for writing your literature review: 1. Introduction Write an introduction paragraph for your review. This paragraph: a. states the topic and inquiry questions for the b. tells the reader specific information on how many articles you reviewed and how you sorted the articles into common themes based on findings (results). 2. Body Before you begin this section, be sure that you have sorted your articles into different themes based. The body of your literature review will include those themes in order of importance, a. Theme 1: a paragraph or several paragraphs that describe the first theme that you identified and compare, contrast and/or connect the articles you’ve selected. 2 b. Theme 2: a paragraph or several paragraphs that describes the second theme that you identified and compare, contrast and/or connect the articles you’ve selected. c. Theme 3: etc. d. Three themes, or concepts, or findings is enough. Find three things in your articles that supports your claim or positions and use those three. 3 Summary This is the last paragraph of your literature review. In this paragraph, it is important to briefly summarize the main findings from the articles that you reviewed and to point out how your questions were answered or not answered, what are the gaps, if any and address them. 4. References This is the last pages of your review. It serves as a listing of all references that you mentioned in your paper. You may use articles you have previously found and used in your article analysis or research proposal. So, four to six sources including the ones you have already used. How will you be graded? Articles: You will be graded based on the number and the credibility of your sources. • Ask yourself: How many articles do I have? Does my number meet the requirements? Are the articles from peer-reviewed journals? Are they scientific? Are they related to my topic? Is there enough stuff in the article that I can use? Theme: You will be graded based on clarity of your argument (again, if I don’t understand it, I won’t be able to grade it fairly). Also, demonstration of logical thinking, solid understanding of the topic you have chosen, and overall value of your research • Ask yourself: Is it organized logically? Does it follow a clear sequence of reasoning? Will others understand what I have written? Do I understand what I have written? Details: You will be graded based on the overall conclusion reached after reading your articles. • Ask yourself: Did I understood what I read in these articles? Do I have an overall understanding of what the latest findings are when it comes to my topic? Can I explain my understanding clearly and concisely? Mechanics: You will be graded based on your adherence to English grammar, correct use of your chosen citation style, your in-text citation, and your reference page. • Ask yourself: Did I read my paper back to my self out loud? Do I have in-text citation for every idea that is not mine? Do I have any quote that I took from others and are they properly marked? Do I have a reference page (does not included in the page count)? Is my citation correctly formatted?

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