VIGNETTE NUMBER ONE:  SAMUEL

PSY510 MODULE ASSESSMENT

Below is Vignette. Please read and follow the instructions below.

Vignette number One is about Samuel. who is 25 years old and has recently been diagnosed with major depression, which the clinician believes is based on his troubled childhood. 

Please read Samuel’s story and, using the evidence given, in NOT MORE THAN 1,500 WORDS, show how Samuel’s counsellor might apply the five levels of influence identified by Uriel Bronfenbrenner in his Ecological Systems Theory.

VIGNETTE NUMBER ONE:  SAMUEL

Samuel is 25 years old.  He has been referred for counselling by his GP to try to overcome the extreme shyness and crippling social awkwardness that are negatively affecting his social interactions and making him depressed.

In order to understand Samuel’s difficulties, the counsellor explores Samuel’s early childhood, and applies Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory to identify any adverse experiences in Samuel’s early life that may have  led to his adult problems.

The following account is an extract from the counsellor’s notes. 

Please read the counsellor’s notes relating to Samuel’s early life and, IN NOT MORE THAN 1,500 WORDS, identify and comment on the five levels of influence (as described by Bronfenbrenner) that might be applied to aid the understanding of Samuel’s experiences.

NAME: SAMUEL

AGE: 25 YEARS

COUNSELLING TOOL: APPLICATION OF BRONFENBRENNER’S ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS THEORY

Samuel was a quiet child with a slightly introverted personality. 

When Samuel was four years old, he began attending the small primary school in the little rural village where he lived with his Dad and his Daddy. Samuel appeared to do well at school and, although he was shy, he seemed happy, and made a few friends amongst the other children in his class.

Samuel loved his Dad and his Daddy but, although he was very young, he had a feeling that some of the neighbours in his village did not like his Dad and Daddy so much.  He saw some of the men turning away when his Dad or his Daddy said hello to them in the shop or the street, and he would sometimes overhear his Dad and Daddy talking and worrying about how they were not liked in the village.  Samuel couldn’t understand why this might be. His Dad and his Daddy were always kind to him. He loved them dearly, and he could not imagine why anyone else would not love them too.

When Samuel was eight years old, his Dad and Daddy decided that they could not live in the small village any longer, because of the prejudice and hostility of the other residents to their family set-up.  So the family moved to the city where they hoped that attitudes would be less judgemental, and they could live in anonymity and peace. 

Samuel’s Dad found part-time work in the kitchen of a big hotel.  His Daddy worked in the gift shop of a local museum.  In summertime, both his Dad and his Daddy worked long hours, when the steady flow of tourists kept the shop and the hotel very busy.   But in wintertime his Dad’s and Daddy’s hours were cut drastically, and the family struggled to cope financially, having to rely on welfare benefits to survive. 

When his family moved to the city, Samuel changed to a different school.  Samuel’s new primary school was much bigger than his previous one, and he found it very hard to make friends and fit in with the other children.

Although he was not being bullied, Samuel was a bit afraid of the more confident children in his class, and would hang back from them at playtime. As a result, he never got invited to join in their play, and he was afraid to approach them to ask if he could play with them.

Samuel’s Dad and Daddy  were concerned about his failure to make friends, and they spoke to his teacher, who  suggested bringing Samuel together with a small number of other children in the “soft play” area of the school, where they could interact away from the noise and activity of the playground.

But this did not really help Samuel. He became even more withdrawn and showed signs of anxiety, so after much debate and discussion Samuel’s parents decided to move Samuel to a smaller primary school in the suburbs of the city.  Although this would mean a longer journey for Samuel, his parents hoped that he would find it easier to settle in the quieter environment. 

Although Samuel settled well into the smaller primary school in the suburbs, and even found a “best friend” whose house he regularly visited, Samuel’s new-found happiness was not complete.  He often heard his parents talking about finding new accommodation. The lease on their rented accommodation was due to run out, and his parents were concerned about finding somewhere else to live, as the landlord had told them that he planned to sell the property. 

Rented accommodation was very hard to find in the city, especially as the family’s income was not steady, and they often had to rely on welfare benefits.  For a period of time, until Samuel was 12, the family were on the homeless register, living in temporary accommodation and moving from hostel to Bed and Breakfast accommodation every few months.  But at last, the family were able to find permanent accommodation through a housing association, and Samuel’s teenage years were relatively stress free, apart from some difficulties he faced in the transition to secondary school, and the problems his shyness caused in such a setting. 

PSY510 MODULE ASSESSMENT

Below is Vignette. Please read and follow the instructions below.

Vignette number One is about Samuel. who is 25 years old and has recently been diagnosed with major depression, which the clinician believes is based on his troubled childhood. 

Please read Samuel’s story and, using the evidence given, in NOT MORE THAN 1,500 WORDS, show how Samuel’s counsellor might apply the five levels of influence identified by Uriel Bronfenbrenner in his Ecological Systems Theory.

VIGNETTE NUMBER ONE:  SAMUEL

Samuel is 25 years old.  He has been referred for counselling by his GP to try to overcome the extreme shyness and crippling social awkwardness that are negatively affecting his social interactions and making him depressed.

In order to understand Samuel’s difficulties, the counsellor explores Samuel’s early childhood, and applies Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory to identify any adverse experiences in Samuel’s early life that may have  led to his adult problems.

The following account is an extract from the counsellor’s notes. 

Please read the counsellor’s notes relating to Samuel’s early life and, IN NOT MORE THAN 1,500 WORDS, identify and comment on the five levels of influence (as described by Bronfenbrenner) that might be applied to aid the understanding of Samuel’s experiences.

NAME: SAMUEL

AGE: 25 YEARS

COUNSELLING TOOL: APPLICATION OF BRONFENBRENNER’S ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS THEORY

Samuel was a quiet child with a slightly introverted personality. 

When Samuel was four years old, he began attending the small primary school in the little rural village where he lived with his Dad and his Daddy. Samuel appeared to do well at school and, although he was shy, he seemed happy, and made a few friends amongst the other children in his class.

Samuel loved his Dad and his Daddy but, although he was very young, he had a feeling that some of the neighbours in his village did not like his Dad and Daddy so much.  He saw some of the men turning away when his Dad or his Daddy said hello to them in the shop or the street, and he would sometimes overhear his Dad and Daddy talking and worrying about how they were not liked in the village.  Samuel couldn’t understand why this might be. His Dad and his Daddy were always kind to him. He loved them dearly, and he could not imagine why anyone else would not love them too.

When Samuel was eight years old, his Dad and Daddy decided that they could not live in the small village any longer, because of the prejudice and hostility of the other residents to their family set-up.  So the family moved to the city where they hoped that attitudes would be less judgemental, and they could live in anonymity and peace. 

Samuel’s Dad found part-time work in the kitchen of a big hotel.  His Daddy worked in the gift shop of a local museum.  In summertime, both his Dad and his Daddy worked long hours, when the steady flow of tourists kept the shop and the hotel very busy.   But in wintertime his Dad’s and Daddy’s hours were cut drastically, and the family struggled to cope financially, having to rely on welfare benefits to survive. 

When his family moved to the city, Samuel changed to a different school.  Samuel’s new primary school was much bigger than his previous one, and he found it very hard to make friends and fit in with the other children.

Although he was not being bullied, Samuel was a bit afraid of the more confident children in his class, and would hang back from them at playtime. As a result, he never got invited to join in their play, and he was afraid to approach them to ask if he could play with them.

Samuel’s Dad and Daddy  were concerned about his failure to make friends, and they spoke to his teacher, who  suggested bringing Samuel together with a small number of other children in the “soft play” area of the school, where they could interact away from the noise and activity of the playground.

But this did not really help Samuel. He became even more withdrawn and showed signs of anxiety, so after much debate and discussion Samuel’s parents decided to move Samuel to a smaller primary school in the suburbs of the city.  Although this would mean a longer journey for Samuel, his parents hoped that he would find it easier to settle in the quieter environment. 

Although Samuel settled well into the smaller primary school in the suburbs, and even found a “best friend” whose house he regularly visited, Samuel’s new-found happiness was not complete.  He often heard his parents talking about finding new accommodation. The lease on their rented accommodation was due to run out, and his parents were concerned about finding somewhere else to live, as the landlord had told them that he planned to sell the property. 

Rented accommodation was very hard to find in the city, especially as the family’s income was not steady, and they often had to rely on welfare benefits.  For a period of time, until Samuel was 12, the family were on the homeless register, living in temporary accommodation and moving from hostel to Bed and Breakfast accommodation every few months.  But at last, the family were able to find permanent accommodation through a housing association, and Samuel’s teenage years were relatively stress free, apart from some difficulties he faced in the transition to secondary school, and the problems his shyness caused in such a setting. 

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