Effective Selection and Placement Strategies

Principles of Management sections 5.1 Ethical Challenges Managers Face and 5.2 Importance of Ethics in Management (text pages 69-72 and/or pdf pages 77-80)

The topic for this assignment is ethics. Please refer to Chapter 3 of Principles of Management sections 5.1 Ethical Challenges Managers Face and 5.2 Importance of Ethics in Management (text pages 69-72 and/or pdf pages 77-80) for a presentation of the subject of ethics for managers. The assignment is a case study analysis. The case deals with the ethics of government in regards to smoking. Government is often involved in the tobacco business. Some countries have had government tobacco monopolies in the past. Most countries impose taxes on tobacco. This presents a conflict of interest in that it is well known that tobacco presents serious health hazards to many users. Read and analyze the case, Ban on Tobacco Ads by the Government of India which is available at http://www.icmrindia.org/free%20resources/casestudies/ban-tobacco-ads11.htm. Please note there is a ?Next? button at the bottom of each page. For your assignment, write a 3 page (double-spaced) case analysis in which you address the following questions: Summarize the arguments in favor of the ban on tobacco advertising in India Summarize the arguments in opposition of the ban on tobacco advertising in India Discuss the conflict of interest issue as it pertains to government in India Give your opinion on what governments should do in regards to tobacco advertising

Principles of
Management
Published by:
Flat World Knowledge, Inc.
13 N. Mill Street
Nyack, NY 10960
This work is licensed under the
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.
To view a copy of this license,
visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/or send a letter to
Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
Printed in the United States of America
Principles of
Management
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Brief Contents
Introduction to Principles of Management
Personality, Attitudes, and Work Behaviors
History, Globalization, and Values-Based Leadership
Developing Mission, Vision, and Values
Strategizing
Goals and Objectives
Organizational Structure and Change
Organizational Culture
Social Networks
Leading People and Organizations
Decision Making
Communication in Organizations
Managing Groups and Teams
Motivating Employees
The Essentials of Control
Strategic Human Resource Management
Index

Chapter 1 1
2
5
9
12
14
18
25
Chapter 2 27
28
37
41
44
45
50
51
Chapter 3 55
56
60
63
67
69
73
Chapter 4 75
77
79
83
89
92
96
100
Chapter 5 101
103
107
110
116
122
Contents
Introduction to Principles of Management
Who Are Managers?
Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Strategy
Planning, Organizing, Leading, and Controlling
Economic, Social, and Environmental Performance
Performance of Individuals and Groups
Your Principles of Management Survivor?s Guide
Endnotes
Personality, Attitudes, and Work Behaviors
Personality and Values
Perception
Work Attitudes
The Interactionist Perspective: The Role of Fit
Work Behaviors
Developing Your Positive Attitude Skills
Endnotes
History, Globalization, and Values-Based Leadership
Ancient History: Management Through the 1990s
Contemporary Principles of Management
Global Trends
Globalization and Principles of Management
Developing Your Values-Based Leadership Skills
Endnotes
Developing Mission, Vision, and Values
The Roles of Mission, Vision, and Values
Mission and Vision in the P-O-L-C Framework
Creativity and Passion
Stakeholders
Crafting Mission and Vision Statements
Developing Your Personal Mission and Vision
Endnotes
Strategizing
Strategic Management in the P-O-L-C Framework
How Do Strategies Emerge?
Strategy as Trade-Offs, Discipline, and Focus
Developing Strategy Through Internal Analysis
Developing Strategy Through External Analysis
128
134
Chapter 6 137
138
141
145
149
153
157
162
Chapter 7 163
164
168
171
177
180
182
Chapter 8 183
184
187
191
198
201
203
Chapter 9 205
206
210
216
220
224
228
Chapter 10 229
230
234
236
242
248
251
Formulating Organizational and Personal Strategy With the Strategy
Diamond
Endnotes
Goals and Objectives
The Nature of Goals and Objectives
From Management by Objectives to the Balanced Scorecard
Characteristics of Effective Goals and Objectives
Using Goals and Objectives in Employee Performance Evaluation
Integrating Goals and Objectives with Corporate Social Responsibility
Your Personal Balanced Scorecard
Endnotes
Organizational Structure and Change
Organizational Structure
Contemporary Forms of Organizational Structures
Organizational Change
Planning and Executing Change Effectively
Building Your Change Management Skills
Endnotes
Organizational Culture
Understanding Organizational Culture
Measuring Organizational Culture
Creating and Maintaining Organizational Culture
Creating Culture Change
Developing Your Personal Skills: Learning to Fit In
Endnotes
Social Networks
An Introduction to the Lexicon of Social Networks
How Managers Can Use Social Networks to Create Value
Ethical Considerations with Social Network Analysis
Personal, Operational, and Strategic Networks
Mapping and Your Own Social Network
Endnotes
Leading People and Organizations
Who Is a Leader? Trait Approaches to Leadership
What Do Leaders Do? Behavioral Approaches to Leadership
What Is the Role of the Context? Contingency Approaches to Leadership
Contemporary Approaches to Leadership
Developing Your Leadership Skills
Endnotes
Chapter 11 253
254
263
265
270
271
Chapter 12 273
274
277
284
288
294
297
Chapter 13 299
300
306
315
318
319
321
Chapter 14 323
324
329
339
341
Chapter 15 343
344
349
352
357
361
364
368
Chapter 16 369
370
374
376
380
383
Decision Making
Understanding Decision Making
Faulty Decision Making
Decision Making in Groups
Developing Your Personal Decision-Making Skills
Endnotes
Communication in Organizations
Understanding Communication
Communication Barriers
Different Types of Communication
Communication Channels
Developing Your Personal Communication Skills
Endnotes
Managing Groups and Teams
Group Dynamics
Understanding Team Design Characteristics
Organizing Effective Teams
Barriers to Effective Teams
Developing Your Team Skills
Endnotes
Motivating Employees
Need-Based Theories of Motivation
Process-Based Theories
Developing Your Personal Motivation Skills
Endnotes
The Essentials of Control
Organizational Control
Types and Levels of Control
Financial Controls
Nonfinancial Controls
Lean Control
Crafting Your Balanced Scorecard
Endnotes
Strategic Human Resource Management
The Changing Role of Strategic Human Resource Management in Principles
of Management
The War for Talent
Effective Selection and Placement Strategies
The Roles of Pay Structure and Pay for Performance
Designing a High-Performance Work System
387
391
394
Tying It All Together?Using the HR Balanced Scorecard to Gauge and
Manage Human Capital, Including Your Own
Endnotes
Index
FIGURE 1.1
Managers make things
happen through strategic
and entrepreneurial
leadership.
? 2010 Jupiterimages Corporation
management
The art of getting things
done through the efforts of
other people.
principles of management
The means by which you
actually manage, that is, get
things done through others.
CHAPTER 1
Introduction to Principles of
Management
WHAT?S IN IT FOR ME?
Reading this chapter will help you do the following:
1. Learn who managers are and about the nature of their work.
2. Know why you should care about leadership, entrepreneurship, and strategy.
3. Know the dimensions of the planning-organizing-leading-controlling (P-O-L-C) framework.
4. Learn how economic performance feeds social and environmental performance.
5. Understand what performance means at the individual and group levels.
6. Create your survivor?s guide to learning and developing principles of management.
We?re betting that you already have a lot of experience with organizations, teams, and leadership. You?ve been
through schools, in clubs, participated in social or religious groups, competed in sports or games, or taken on fullor
part-time jobs. Some of your experience was probably pretty positive, but you were also likely wondering
sometimes, ?Isn?t there a better way to do this??
After participating in this course, we hope that you find the answer to be ?Yes!? While management is both art
and science, with our help you can identify and develop the skills essential to better managing your and others?
behaviors where organizations are concerned.
Before getting ahead of ourselves, just what is management, let alone principles of management? A manager?s
primary challenge is to solve problems creatively, and you should view management as ?the art of getting things
done through the efforts of other people.?[1] The principles of management, then, are the means by which you
actually manage, that is, get things done through others?individually, in groups, or in organizations. Formally
defined, the principles of management are the activities that ?plan, organize, and control the operations of the
basic elements of [people], materials, machines, methods, money and markets, providing direction and
coordination, and giving leadership to human efforts, so as to achieve the sought objectives of the enterprise.?[2]
For this reason, principles of management are often discussed or learned using a framework called P-O-L-C, which
stands for planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.
Managers are required in all the activities of organizations: budgeting, designing, selling, creating, financing,
accounting, and artistic presentation; the larger the organization, the more managers are needed. Everyone
employed in an organization is affected by management principles, processes, policies, and practices as they are
either a manager or a subordinate to a manager, and usually they are both.
Managers do not spend all their time managing. When choreographers are dancing a part, they are not
managing, nor are office managers managing when they personally check out a customer?s credit. Some
employees perform only part of the functions described as managerial?and to that extent, they are mostly
empowerment
The process of enabling or
authorizing an individual to
think, behave, take action,
and control work and
decision making in
autonomous ways.
FIGURE 1.2
Communication is a key
managerial role.
? 2010 Jupiterimages Corporation
managers in limited areas. For example, those who are assigned the preparation of plans in an advisory capacity to
a manager, to that extent, are making management decisions by deciding which of several alternatives to present
to the management. However, they have no participation in the functions of organizing, staffing, and supervising
and no control over the implementation of the plan selected from those recommended. Even independent
consultants are managers, since they get most things done through others?those others just happen to be their
clients! Of course, if advisers or consultants have their own staff of subordinates, they become a manager in the
fullest sense of the definition. They must develop business plans; hire, train, organize, and motivate their staff
members; establish internal policies that will facilitate the work and direct it; and represent the group and its work
to those outside of the firm.
1. WHO ARE MANAGERS?
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Know what is meant by ?manager?.
2. Be able to describe the types of managers.
3. Understand the nature of managerial work.
1.1 Managers
We tend to think about managers based on their position in an organization. This tells us a bit about
their role and the nature of their responsibilities. The following figure summarizes the historic and
contemporary views of organizations with respect to managerial roles.[3] In contrast to the traditional,
hierarchical relationship among layers of management and managers and employees, in the contemporary
view, top managers support and serve other managers and employees (through a process called
empowerment), just as the organization ultimately exists to serve its customers and clients. Empowerment
is the process of enabling or authorizing an individual to think, behave, take action, and control
work and decision making in autonomous ways.
In both the traditional and contemporary views of management, however, there remains the need
for different types of managers. Top managers are responsible for developing the organization?s
strategy and being a steward for its vision and mission. A second set of managers includes functional,
team, and general managers. Functional managers are responsible for the efficiency and effectiveness of
an area, such as accounting or marketing. Supervisory or team managers are responsible for coordinating
a subgroup of a particular function or a team composed of members from different parts of the organization.
Sometimes you will hear distinctions made between line and staff managers.
A line manager leads a function that contributes directly to the products or services the organization
creates. For example, a line manager (often called a product, or service manager) at Procter &
Gamble (P&G) is responsible for the production, marketing, and profitability of the Tide detergent
product line. A staff manager, in contrast, leads a function that creates indirect inputs. For example,
finance and accounting are critical organizational functions but do not typically provide an input into
the final product or service a customer buys, such as a box of Tide detergent. Instead, they serve a supporting
role. A project manager has the responsibility for the planning, execution, and closing of any
project. Project managers are often found in construction, architecture, consulting, computer networking,
telecommunications, or software development.
A general manager is someone who is responsible for managing a clearly identifiable revenue-producing
unit, such as a store, business unit, or product line. General managers typically must make decisions
across different functions and have rewards tied to the performance of the entire unit (i.e., store,
business unit, product line, etc.). General managers take direction from their top executives. They must
first understand the executives? overall plan for the company. Then they set specific goals for their own
departments to fit in with the plan. The general manager of production, for example, might have to increase
certain product lines and phase out others. General managers must describe their goals clearly to
their support staff. The supervisory managers see that the goals are met.
2 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
FIGURE 1.3 The Changing Roles of Management and Managers
1.2 The Nature of Managerial Work
Managers are responsible for the processes of getting activities completed efficiently with and through
other people and setting and achieving the firm?s goals through the execution of four basic management
functions: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Both sets of processes utilize human,
financial, and material resources.

Posted in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply