English for awesome writers

English for awesome writers.

 

Library Assignment—English 3010—Winter 2019

1

Library Assignment—English 3010—Winter 2019 Please put a numbered list with the answers to each of the following 7 questions into the text-entry box in Canvas for this assignment before Saturday, October 13 at 11:30 p.m. 1) Go to the WSU Library System homepage (https://library.wayne.edu). You may want to bookmark this site. Scroll to the bottom of the page where the actual links you’ll need are hidden in tiny light-grey on dark-grey font. Click on “hours” in the third column from the left, headed “Libraries.” What time does the Purdy/Kresge library close today? 2) Now, go back to the library homepage and click on the “Article Databases” link either at the top or the bottom of the page in the first column under “Resources.” Click on the “P” under the search boxes. On the resulting page, scroll down to the link for “PsycArticles” and click on it. In the library or elsewhere on campus, this will take you directly to the database; if you’re at home, you’ll get the “EZProxy Login” screen, and you’ll log in using your WSU “access i.d.” and your e-mail password. On the PsycARTICLES page, click on the blue “Advanced Search” link below the search box. In the first search box, type “methylphenidate” and change the dropdown option at the end of that row from “Select a Field (optional)” to “SU Subjects.” In the search box in the next row, type “rats.” In the third row, type in “McDougall” (spell carefully), and change the dropdown to “AU author.” Click the green “Search” button. In the search result that comes up next will be a citation for an article entitled “Effects of repeated methylphenidate treatment in the young rat [ . . . ]” by McDougall, et al. (it should be the first citation) and click on the “PDF Full Text ” link at the bottom of the reference. This will go to a window in which the .pdf of the article will appear (if your browser can open .pdf’s). In the first sentence of the first full paragraph in the right column of the first page of the article, what do the authors say were the three psychostimulants were used in the cited study by Castro, et al. on chronic treatment in adult rats? 3) Return again to the library system homepage. Click on the “Article Databases” link again. Click on “C” this time. Find CINAHL Complete on the resulting list and click on it. Just as PsychArticles is an important database for doing research in the professional journal literature for Psychology, so CINAHL is the database for the journal literature in Nursing (the acronym stands for “Current Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature”). Here, we’re supposing that you’re looking for articles in the Nursing journals comparing the barrier effectiveness of latex and nitrile gloves, the idea being to avoid allergic complications that arise with latex, but without adopting an unreliable alternative. In CINAHL, used the “Advanced Search” option to search “latex gloves” (which you should literally put in quotation marks, just as you see it here, because that lets the system know you literally want to search the phrase “latex gloves.” You should do this whenever you are searching a phrase and not just single words) in the first search box and just the word nitrile in the search box below it. Click the green “Search” button. In the search results, find the article entitled “In-use barrier integrity of gloves: latex and nitrile superior to vinyl.” It will probably be the 8th entry in the list. Click on the

“ ” button at the bottom of the citation. This should take you directly to an html version of the article, but download the .pdf from the link in the upper left, just for

Library Assignment—English 3010—Winter 2019

2

practice in doing this. In the abstract at the beginning of the article under “Results: ,” find the failure rates for vinyl, latex and nitrile gloves after “manipulation.” What are those failure rates (%)? 4) Now, the tricky part: Go back to the previous screen with the html version of the article. On the right side of the window is the “360 Link” information headed by the WSU logo. Look at the bottom of that column under “Still need help?” See where it says, “Still no full-text?” Had this article not been available online, you’d have needed this information to find it through alternate means. Let’s see if the library has it in print, too. Click the link that says “Check catalog by journal ISSN.” Does the WSU library system have this article in print? Here, you’ll want to be sure to check the holdings information in the box at the top of the record to see if we have the date you need (the date of the article, which is listed in its citation in your search result). If WSU does have the journal for that date (October 1999, volume 27, issue number 5), which library has it? 5) Now, close the two excess windows or tabs and return yet again to the library homepage. Click on the link at the top of the page labeled “CATALOG” to get into the library’s catalog system. In the default search box, type the title Hard Times into the box next to the pulldown menu which defaults to a “KEYWORD” search. Change that pulldown option to “TITLE.” Click the “Submit” button. As you can see from the search result here, there are many items in the library’s catalog which have titles that begin “hard times.” Here’s the thing: What we want to find in this search is the novel by Charles Dickens entitled Hard Times, which is also sometimes known as Hard Times for These Times, so look for the entry under that full title (it will probably be #16). It will be the one which indicates that there are “6 entries” under that more specific title. Click on that link. Name one WSU library in which it’s located. What is its call number in that library? 6) One of the most important and often-used reference books is the Statistical Abstract of the United States. Search for it by its title in the library system catalog. In the resulting list, find the 2012 edition. It should be number 5. What WSU library has it in hard copy (on the shelf, not online) and what is the call number of the latest (2012) edition that they have? (Hint: we’re looking at “Location” at the bottom of the box at the top of the record; the call number is a SuDocs number, not an ordinary Library of Congress number.) 7) Return one last time to the library homepage and click again on the “Catalog” link, and then enter the title “new york times historical” in the “Simple search” portion of the box. This should retrieve one entry only. In large, green letters, there’s a link with the full title “New York Times Historical Full-Text” near the top of that catalog record (it’s the section labeled “Click to access database or publisher website” with weird capitalization). Click on that. This takes you to what is actually a complete electronic database of all of the New York Times newspaper from the years 1851-2009. In fact, it includes facsimiles of the actual pages from the Times.

Library Assignment—English 3010—Winter 2019

3

Click on the “Advanced Search” link right below the title—it says “ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times (1851-2010).” On the resulting search screen, go down to the section headed “Publication date:” select “on this date” from the pulldown menu and enter your date of birth by using the date and month pulldowns and by typing in the year. Then click the blue-green Search button below and to the right. Look through the New York Times headlines from the day you were born, pick an interesting one, and click on the headline (title). In the record for that article, click on the “Browse this issue” link on the right side under the WSU logo (not the PDF link). This will be a reproduction of the entire page of the Times on which that particular article appeared with the selected article highlighted. Now, click on that facsimile page on a different article from the one with the headline that originally led you to that page map (the page will have separate links for each article on the page). Now that you’ve seen it, what’s the headline for that second article? Okay, that’s it. You’re finished. This is, of course, not nearly all you need to know about library research, but it’s enough to keep you more or less sane until you can get help if you need it. That’s an important point, because you should be aware that, when all else fails, ask a librarian. They’re professionals at this stuff—master’s degrees and everything—and it’s their job to help you figure out what they’ve done with all the stuff you need to find. Remember that you should just enter a numbered list with your answers to the above questions in the text-entry box for this assignment before 11:30 p.m. on Saturday October 13.

English for awesome writers

Posted in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply