What is the history of “smart cards”?

What is the history of “smart cards”?.

What is the history of “smart cards”?

Perform a literature search in the GCU Library on smart card technology and write a 1,000 to 1,250-word paper that addresses the topic and, specifically, the following questions:

  1. What is the history of “smart cards”? Which industries have utilized smart card technology successfully?
  2. Explain the concept of “stored value” as it applies to smart card technologies and describe how this feature might be utilized by consumers to obtain health care services.
  3. Explain how smart cards can reduce fraud and streamline administrative procedures.
  4. What are the futurist projections for the use of smart cards in 5 to 10 years?

You are required to use a minimum of three qualified, current (no more than 5 years old) publication references with in-text citations for this paper.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin. Please refer to the directions in the Student Success Center

 

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What is the history of “smart cards”?

Handling Influx and Evacuation

Handling Influx and Evacuation.

Handling Influx and Evacuation

The ability to deal with the unexpected influx of patients is a key challenge in a disaster scenario. In order to be truly prepared, a healthcare organization must be ready to deal with the increased number of patients. In some cases, the military is also available to assist in dealing with the influx of patients. The military is highly trained and has a vast number of resources that most citizens are not aware of. They are equipped and have the skill-set and the mentality to respond efficiently to disasters.

Using the Internet, search some articles on civilian response to disaster situations and military disaster response process. Based on your research, answer the following questions:

  • Would you request the military to assist you in dealing with the influx of patients at the hospital? Why or why not? If yes, how would you use the military, and if no, what would you and your staff do to deal with the influx of patients?
  • How would you go about garnering the assistance of the military if the situation called for it?

Following Hurricane Katrina, a hospital needed to be evacuated because of the rising water. The evacuation was conducted in stages as the patients were moved to other safe hospitals in batches using a helicopter, an ambulance, and a boat. After four days, the evacuation was complete, thanks to a coordinated effort with other agencies such as the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. In regard to the given scenario, answer the following questions:

  • What would have happened if the hospital had not been assisted by other agencies? Why?
  • How would you have addressed the situation? What would you include in your disaster plan to handle such a situation? How?

 

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Handling Influx and Evacuation

Contemporary Technology

Contemporary Technology.

Contemporary Technology

 

One Page Proposal should include the following elements:

    • Technology and/or Social Topic for the project
    • Significance and importance of the topic as well as your interests
    • Identify key issues and resources for additional information or study
    • Research plan, anticipated results and Timeline.

Following is a list of project topics:

 

Contemporary Technology:

3D Printer, UAV, Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Nanotechnology, Block chain, Bitcoin, Cloud Computing, Big Data Technology, etc.

 

Technology in Society:

Technology and finance, Technology and food safety, Technology and agriculture, Technology and politics, Technology and government, Technology and education, etc.

 

Technology in History:

Technology Diffusion in Japan, Technology Diffusion in China, Technology Diffusion in India

Technology Diffusion in Saudi Arabia, Technology Diffusion in Israel,

Technology Diffusion in Africa, etc.

Theories and Philosophy:

Technology Determinism and Artificial Intelligence, Constructivism and Big Data, Max Weber and C.S. Lewis, Adam Smith and Karl Marx, Scripture Perspective of Technology Advancement, etc.

 

Task 2 – Project Report

 

For report writing, please use APA format (Max 10 pages Time New Roman font 12, 1 1/2 space including front matters, body and back end matters).

Please use the following outline for the individual report:

  • Introduction – technology researched for this project, significance and value of technology, etc.
  • Background – history, major development, research questions, hypotheses, social and culture settings, text book relevance, e.g.: driving forces, technology diffusion, global impact and convergence, technology determinism, etc.
  • Results- literature review, personal interview, major findings, data, pictures, videos, society impacts, trends, points related to topics in the textbook, answers to research questions, possible theory and explanation of phenomena for proposed hypotheses, etc.
  • Conclusions and Discussions – summary of your work, surprises, serendipities, discussions of what learned related to technology, research process, team work, course goals, etc.
  • References in APA style

 

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Contemporary Technology

Experiment with the Daisy World

Experiment with the Daisy World.

Experiment with the Daisy World (“Daisy Ball”) 

Daisy World is a very simple model of a system with external forcing  (“solar luminosity”) and feedbacks (white and black daisies).

Solar luminosity increases with time, and the system tries to keep  the temperature from rising (“stable climate”) by changing the area  covered by white and black daisies. White daisies prefer warmer  temperatures and have high albedo, black daisies prefer colder  temperatures and have low albedo. See notes for the “Climate Feedbacks”  lecture and online description at  http://gingerbooth.com/flash/daisyball/ for more details.

For this assignment, use the online model at  http://gingerbooth.com/flash/daisyball/DaisyBall.html. An example of a  “climate simulation” is in the Figure 1 below. On the left of this figure, you see two graphs:

(top plot) area taken by white (white line) and black (black line) daisies, and area that is taken by bare land (brown line);

(bottom plot) temperature of the Daisy World: actual temperature  (purple) and temperature this planet would have if there were no daisies  (brown).

As the time passes, the solar luminosity increases in both plots.

FIGURE 1: 

For the assignment: 

  1. 1)  Run the standard case (default parameters) and describe what you see
  2. 2)  Now change the system parameters by clicking on “Advanced” button. You will see several
    options (Figure 2). Change one of the parameters:  albedo of black/white daisies, how fast luminosity changes, daisy  “deathrate” (minimum area covered by daisies), etc. Describe how the  system behavior is different from the standard case. Explain what you  see.

 

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Experiment with the Daisy World

 Extra Credit Opportunity

 Extra Credit Opportunity.

Extra Credit Opportunity

Typically I am asked after the first midterm whether I give extra credit. The answer is YES. If you’d like to earn 5% extra credit points, you can do a project (due March 19 , the last day of class). The extra credit project is meant to give you the experience of dealing with real data … believe me, it’s tougher than you think, but it’s a great learning experience, and I’m here to help. Here’s what you need to do:

1) Think of a topic you want to research and write up (1) your research question, and (2) a brief questionnaire (maybe 5 or 6 questions) which includes at least two nominal variables and at least two ratio variables. For example, suppose you want to study the factors which affected people’s midterm #1 score. In that case you might want to include questions such as:

· Do you work? ___ Yes, full time ___ Yes, part time ___ No

· Gender: ___ Male ___ Female

· How many hours did you study for midterm #1? _____

· How many hours of sleep did you get the night before the exam? ___

· What was your midterm score? ___

Your topic could be based on something at work, something from another class, something about a hobby, or whatever. It’s up to you. NOTE: you MUST get your research question and questionnaire approved by me before you start…check with me no later than Wednesday, February 14 , or you can’t do the project. E-mail communication is fine, or just stop by to see me. NO EXCEPTIONS. This time frame will give you plenty of time to get the project done

2) Collect data from 20 or 30 of your classmates, friends or family members. You can either use a paper/pencil approach, or else I and the graduate assistants can show you how to do online surveys using Qualtrics or Google Docs. I just want you to have enough data to play with! Feel free to arrive to class early and ask your classmates to fill out your survey. I don’t expect you to use probabilistic techniques to select your sample, but think about how you would have done the study if you’d had the time and money to do it right. You will have to include a methodology section in your final report, indicating what the “right” way to sample would have been. You should have your data collected by Wednesday, February 28 so that you have enough time to work on your analysis.

3) Enter the data into Excel. Each person should have one row. You should have one column for each variable. For the above questionnaire the spreadsheet might look like this:

Person Work Gender* Study Sleep Score
1 No 1 6 2 90
2 No 2 5.5 3 80
3 Part time 1 1 4 50

* NOTE: gender = 1 means male, gender = 2 means female

4) Run some descriptive statistics (proportions, means, standard deviations) and graphs. Be sure you use the proper type of analysis depending on the type of data you have. In other words, don’t try to find averages and standard deviations for nominal variables like gender or work!

5) Conduct at least 2 hypothesis tests or confidence intervals using the data. For example:

a) In the past, people got an average of 6 hours of sleep the night before the exam, but I think that may be decreasing due to the complex lives we now lead. Is it true that sleep time has decreased?

b) Is there a relationship between the number of hours of study time and the midterm score?

c) Find the 95% confidence interval for the proportion of students who got a passing score on the exam.

You get the idea….you might want to check your analysis plan with me no later than Wednesday, March 7 so that I can re-focus you if you are going the wrong direction.

6) Write up a brief report of your findings. Pretend you are writing it for an employer who knows nothing about statistics…it must be in business format and must include the following:

· An introductory paragraph indicating the topic (research question) you are studying. In other words, state the reason why you are doing this study – other than for the extra credit points, of course.

· A paragraph about the methodology used and the methodology you SHOULD have used if you’d had the time and money to do it right. Be sure to identify the target population, best sampling technique to use (be specific), best mode of delivery of the survey (phone, text, e-mail, mail, etc.). I want details! Just saying “I would use a stratified sampling technique” isn’t enough…what are your strata, what list(s) will you use to draw from, would it have been best to do a phone survey or mail survey, etc.

· Statistical analyses (presentation of all graphs, calculations, hypothesis tests using the 6 step procedure discussed in class, etc.) – this will take several pages.

· A final section which should present an overview of your interpretation of the findings. This would be like a “briefing” you would give an employer.

Please be sure to include a printed copy of your questionnaire and spreadsheet so that I can see what you did. Do NOT bother to include the actual filled-out survey forms.

NOTE: there is no page limit/requirement, but typically it takes around 5 – 10 pages to do what I’ve asked for in your report.

 

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 Extra Credit Opportunity

CellPoint Mobile’s participation in the Aviation Festival Americas 2018 conference

CellPoint Mobile’s participation in the Aviation Festival Americas 2018 conference.

CellPoint Mobile’s participation in the Aviation Festival Americas

This is an assignment for a Marketing case study
Please create an event plan for CellPoint Mobile’s participation in the Aviation Festival Americas 2018 conference this May, based on the parameters below.

Project Goals
1. Solidify presence among airlines located and/or operating within the Americas; create new business opportunities through direct engagement with airlines attending the event, as well as carriers located in North America and LATAM.
2. Boost awareness of CellPoint Mobile’s product portfolio and ability to help airlines serve their passengers’ needs across all aspects of a travel transaction (shopping, payment, etc.)

Client Background
CellPoint Mobile provides airlines, passenger transportation operators, and hospitality service providers across the globe with flexible, configurable solutions that help them collect revenues from the mobile channel and profitably manage interactions and transactions from both the selling side and the payment side. Dedicated to a client-first, mobile-first culture since 2007, CellPoint Mobile provides companies with the fintech and travel-tech solutions they need to get to market quickly: booking, payments, alternative payment methods, loyalty transactions, communications, stored payment capability, real-time reporting, reconciliation, connections to payment service providers and acquirers, and more.

CellPoint Mobile is making inroads into the Caribbean airline market, but does not yet have a US or LATAM client. This conference is very important to the company’s sales representatives who are actively working to land a sale in the region.

Event Considerations
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Include:
1. Sponsorship options
2. Networking event hosted by CellPoint Mobile
3. Marketing collateral needs and marketing strategy for the event
4. Attendees to target for meetings
5. Budget projections
6. Schedule of proposed timing and duration for all elements
7. Suggested benchmarks/KPIs with estimates of event success

Project Budget
Please provide a low and a high budget option. High should not exceed $20K. There is no need to get actual prices from vendors, rough estimates and use of the data on the event website is sufficient.

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CellPoint Mobile’s participation in the Aviation Festival Americas 2018 conference

Unified Modeling Language

Unified Modeling Language.

Unified Modeling Language

Part 1:

1. Describe situations where it would be appropriate to create a project organization chart, a responsibility assignment matrix, a RACI chart and a resource histogram. Describe what these charts or matrices look like – 5 Points

2. Summarize different tools and techniques project managers can use to help them manage project teams. What can they do to manage virtual team members– 5 Points

Part 2:

provide your reflection on design strategy with UML diagram and how would you think it will influence the overall communication with stakeholders of your project?

Then, response to colleagues’ reply:

“ UML (Unified Modeling Language) is a modeling language that is used to visualize an architecture, design, and implementation of a complex software system. UML is used in the beginning phases of an up-and-coming project to show the very first steps that will be taken to achieve the end goal of a new design or upgrade to a previous design. UML is also a fantastic way to show how the project is built to even those who may not be technical, such as stakeholders and other project team members that are not involved in the design processes. For my group project, a team member for mine displayed how our Kiosk system will be implemented by the utilization of UML. The UML design matched up to the entire scope and I believe will help the client, various stakeholders, and Project Manager decide on if the design plan is what they expected it to be, and if they would like any changes made to the project before its finalization.

Resource:https://www.lucidchart.com/pages/what-is-UML-unified-modeling-language”

 

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Unified Modeling Language

Aerial Photographs and Coordinate Systems

Aerial Photographs and Coordinate Systems.

Aerial Photographs and Coordinate Systems

1

Aerial Photographs and Coordinate Systems
Name:___________________________________ Date:____________________ Section:______________________
Part One: Aerial Photographs
So far, we’ve been investigating the rocks and minerals that make up the body of our world, as well as how to put them
in chronological order. But how do geologists actually locate the specimens that they use in their never ending quest to
understand the Earth?
As much as Hollywood might claim otherwise, the Earth’s interior is largely inaccessible to humans. The deepest
borehole on record only managed to tunnel down 7.6 miles, only one third the thickness of the continental crust. In
fact, almost everything that we know of our planet’s interior was gleaned by studying the distribution and physical
properties of rocks at the surface. That’s where aerial photographs come into play. An aerial photograph is little more
than an image of the Earth’s surface as captured by an airborne vehicle (aircraft, balloon, surveillance drone, etc.).
Originally used to map vegetation, these photos have become an essential tool in mapping and studying the distribution
of geologic landforms across our planet.
Taken from cameras mounted vertically in the belly of an aircraft, sequences of photographs are captured as the plane
flies in parallel strips along a cardinal direction. Each photograph covers 60 percent of the area covered by the previous
exposure (endlap). Adjoining strips generally overlap on the edges (sidelap) about 30 percent. While it might seem a
waste of time and money to take hundreds of similar photos, the overlap can be used to create three dimensional
images when viewed through specialized device called a stereoscope. Pairs of overlapping aerial photographs are called
stereopairs (Figure 1).
What Can an Aerial Photograph Teach Me About the Earth’s Surface?
Shapes (the form of an object) and patterns (the spatial arrangement of objects) can be easily gleaned from aerial
photography. Generally, the more uniform the shape or pattern of an object, the less likely it is to be a natural
landform. Aerial photos can also be used to calculate the size (surface area) of an object if the scale (the ratio of
distance) of the image (or something within the image area) is known. For size, this only works if the image has been
rectified to account for radial distortion (objects closer to the viewer look larger than those farther away). The
tone/color of an object, relative to others, may be used to help identify unknown landforms. Quartz sand, for example,
Figure 1: Stereopair of Yokoate-jima in the southern Tokara Islands, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan
2
often appears bright white on aerial images, whereas water usually appears dark. Shadows can provide information
about the height and shape of an object, as well as the direction of the sun (note: as a rule, most aerial photography is
conducted near solar noon so that shadows are minimized). Texture (in this case, the “smoothness” or “roughness” of
an area) is produced by a bunch of features too small to identify individually, and is often unique to a particular
substance (e.g. forests and bare rock tend to appear “rough” while water, grass, and loose sediment generally appear
“smooth”). Also worth considering are site and association. Sink holes are large circular depressions in the ground
caused by cave collapse and are readily identified in aerial photos. As these landforms only form in regions underlain by
limestone, a geologist observing them on an aerial photo can rule out the possibility of granite or gneiss bedrock in that
region. In this example, “site” would be the observation of sinkholes, whereas “association” would be associating said
sinkholes with a particular type of bedrock (limestone). Aerial photos can also provide a physical record of change over
a region. For example, Figure 2 depicts a portion of Plano Texas in 1974 (figure 2a) and in 2014 (figure 2b). Note the
rapid development of farmland wet of the 75 corridor.
Applying Your Knowledge:
Figure 3 is an aerial photograph of Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side of the acclaimed Niagara Falls. Also visible in
the image is part of Clifton Hill, a popular tourist area. Use it to answer questions 1 and 2.
U.S. 75
Figure 2a: Portion of Plano Texas, 1974 Figure 2b: The same portion of Plano Texas, 2014
Figure 3
3
1. Identify the features below and label them on Figure 3. For each feature, explain your reasoning (i.e. why
did you identify a particular feature as one thing or another).
Feature
Horseshoe Falls:
Rapids:
A parking lot:
A forest:
A grassy field:
A tall building:
Reconsider figure 1. Use it to answer questions 2-7.
2. Look at the image using a stereoscope. Place a red “X” on one of the images to mark the highest elevation in the
image area.
3. Place a blue “X” on one of the images to mark the lowest elevation in the image area.
4. Label several areas that appear to be exposed rock.
5. Label an area that is heavily forested.
6. Does the summit (top) of the volcano terminate in a cone or a depression?
7. Notice the white strip surrounding the island. Thinking logically, what do you think this represents?
Part Two: Scale
Obviously, images and maps are not the same scale as the area that they represent; otherwise they wouldn’t fit in our
lab room (or in the school building for that matter). The moment we shrink down an image or map, we must use a scale
to compare distances on this smaller representation to actual distances in reality.
4
Two types of scales are
generally printed on most
maps you will be using in
this class (e.g., topographic
maps): a fractional scale
and a bar scale (Figure 4)
The fractional scale
represents the size of the map compared to the area being depicted. The standard scale for most modern topographic
maps is 1:24,000. This means the map is a 1/24,000th version of the real-world area. If the map was blown up 24,000
times it would be the same size as the entire real-world area. Also this means that 1 unit of measure on the map equals
24,000 of the same unit in real life (Figure 5).
A bar scale is a linear scale that is used for measuring distances on the map, and is represented graphically in English and
metric units (Figure 4). If the map includes a coast, there may also be a separate scale for nautical miles. Be careful
when using these scales and note the location of the zero marker; some bar scales have subdivisions that make it
difficult to interpret the full length of the bar. A third type of scale, called a verbal scale, can be used as well. A verbal
scale is simply a statement of how distance on the map equates to distance on the ground (e.g. “one inch equals two
miles).
Applying Your Knowledge:
8. Some topographic maps use a fractional scale of 1:62,500. Using Figure 5 as a guide, determine how many miles one
inch would equal for this scale. Show your work.
9. On a map with a fractional scale of 1:3000000, the distance between two cities is 18 cm. How many kilometers apart
are they? Show your work.
10. How many miles apart are the two cities in question 9? Show your work. (1km = .62 miles)
Figure 4
Figure 5: Making sense of fractional scales
1 inch on the map equals 24,000 inches in the real world, so…
1” = 24,000” 24,000”/12” = 2000 feet 2000’/5280(feet in a mile) = 0.38 miles
1 cm on the map equals 24,000 cm in the real world, so…
1cm = 24,000cm 24,000cm/100,000(cm in a km) = 0.24km
5
Figure 6 is a satellite view of the Spring Creek Campus. Use it to answer questions 11-14.
11. Using the graphic scale provided, estimate the length of the main building to the nearest foot.
12. What direction is the sun coming from?
13. What is the verbal scale for Figure 6? Show your work. Hint: _________map inches = _________miles
14. What is the fractional scale for Figure 6? Show your work.
15. True or false (if false, explain why): A map with a fractional scale of 1:250,000,000 depicts a relatively small area of
the Earth’s surface.
Figure 6
N
6
Part Three: Coordinate Systems
If you wanted to convey your physical location to someone in another country, how might you go about doing so? You’d
probably start off with your country of origin, and further fine tune it by specifying state, county, city, street and finally
the number etched into your mailbox. All of these locators, however, depend on geographic markers…which can change
dramatically over time. A quantitative system with universally defined parameters would be more useful, and three of
them have seen extensive use among the scientific community: The Latitude/Longitude, Universal Transverse Mercator
(UTM) and Public Land Survey Coordinate Systems. We will focus exclusively on the Latitude/Longitude and Public Land
Survey systems because they are more familiar to the average American.
Think of the Latitude and Longitude Coordinate System as a grid that has been superimposed over the curved surface of
the Earth (Figure 7). Lines of latitude run east/west and are called parallels because every line of latitude is parallel to
every other line of latitude (that is to say that they never cross). All lines of latitude are measured in degrees north or
south of the equator (an imaginary line that divides our planet into the northern and southern hemispheres). 90° north
is the North Pole and 90° south is the South Pole.
Lines of Longitude run vertically (north/south) and are known as meridians. They converge at the poles and are widest
apart at the equator. Zero degrees longitude lies along an imaginary line called the Prime Meridian, which passes over
Greenwich, England, the site of the British Royal Greenwich Observatory. All lines of longitude are measured in degrees
east or west of the Prime Meridian, increasing to a value of 180°, east and west, where they eventually meet to form the
International Date Line.
Lines of latitude and longitude are measured in degrees…but why? This is because the Earth is round. A degree
(formally a degree of arc) is 1/360th of a circle, and as the Earth is a round object, it makes sense to use degrees as a unit
of measurement. However, when used to pinpoint smaller regions or structures on a topographic map, degrees alone
are not adequate, and thus they are often subdivided into smaller increments called minutes and seconds. Each degree
(°) contains 60 minutes (‘) and each minute contains 60 seconds (“).
Figure 7: Latitude and
Longitude
7
Writing Latitude and Longitude Coordinates for a Location on the Earth’s Surface
As an example of how to properly write a latitude longitude coordinate let’s use St. Louis, Missouri (Figure 8). St. Louis is
in the northern hemisphere (north of the equator) and the city’s latitude is written as 38° 37 ′38″N. (Thirty-eight
degrees, thirty-seven minutes and thirty-eight seconds of arc north of the equator.) It is very important to always
include the N or S designation for latitudes, as there are technically two lines of latitude (one in the northern
hemisphere and one in the southern) that would share that same value.
St. Louis is west of the Prime Meridian and the
city’s longitude is written as 90° 11′ 52″W.
(Ninety degrees, eleven minutes and fifty-two
seconds of arc west of the Prime Meridian.)
Again, it is important to specify whether your
line of longitude is east or west of the Prime
Meridian. Note: On maps involving the United
States, all latitude measurements will be north
and all longitude measurements will be west.
Most topographic maps in use today are
designated as 7.5 minute series. This means that
the map area covered measures 7.5’ from the
bottom of the map to the top and 7.5’ from one
side to the other.
The Public Land Survey System
The Public Land Survey System (PLSS) is a way
of subdividing and describing land in the United
States. After the Declaration of Independence,
the Continental Congress was deeply in debt yet
the country had vast amounts of unused land,
primarily west of the 13 original colonies. The
federal government decided to use the sale of
these Western Territories to pay off debt incurred from the Revolutionary War. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was the
beginning of the Public Land Survey System. The PLSS divides land into squares six miles on a side called congressional
townships. These congressional townships are further subdivided into 36 one square mile sections. Sections are further
subdivided into quarter sections and quarter-quarter sections, etc.(Figure 9).
PLSS surveys begin at an initial point, and congressional townships are surveyed north, south, east, and west from that
point. The north-south line that runs through the initial starting point is called the Principal Meridian. The east-west line
that runs through the initial point, perpendicular to the Principal Meridian, is called a Base Line. There are several
Principle Meridians and Base Lines throughout the US, and in some places several states may share the same Principal
Meridian and Base Line.
Each congressional township is measured relative to the Principle Meridian and Base Line in a sort of x-y coordinate
system, where its y-position is called a tier and its x-position is called a range. Tiers are 6 mile-wide rows that are
measured north or south of the Base Line, while ranges are 6 mile-wide columns measured east or west of the Principal
Meridian (Figure 10).
St. Louis
Figure 8: Latitude and Longitude of St.
Louis, Missouri
8
Figure 9
9
Applying Your Knowledge:
16. Using the map provided by your instructor, find the latitude and longitude coordinates for the following features.
Show your work for this question on page 10.
Map Name: ______________________________________________________________
Feature Name Latitude/Longitude
A.
B.
C.
17. Using the map provided by your instructor find the PLSS coordinates for the following features
Map Name: ______________________________________________________________
Feature Name Complete Township/Range coordinate
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
10
Work for question 16:

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Aerial Photographs and Coordinate Systems

Describe what is meant by the “Internet of Things”

Describe what is meant by the “Internet of Things”.

Describe what is meant by the “Internet of Things”.

· What industries are most likely to use Internet of Things technology?

· What are the challenges of Internet of Things?

Video:

Bare with the audio of this TED talk.  It improves after the first two minutes.  Dr. John Barrett describes how over time most everything will be connected to the Internet.

 

Dr. John Barrett is Head of Academic Studies at the Nimbus Centre for Embedded Systems Research at Cork Institute of Technology (CIT) and Group Director of the Centre’s Smart Systems Integration Research Group. His research is focused on packaging, miniaturisation and embedding of smart systems in materials, objects and structures. He has been active in Irish and European R&D projects in the areas of packaging and systems integration for almost 30 years and has over 100 publications in topics related to his field.

The Internet of Things: Dr. John Barrett at TEDxCIT

 

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Describe what is meant by the “Internet of Things”

Choosing Appropriate Graphics

Choosing Appropriate Graphics.

Choosing Appropriate Graphics

Instructions:
Select 5 of the 8 scenarios and create the best graphic (figures and tables) for presenting the information in the situations below. Identify each graphic by the scenario number. You may create the graphics in Excel and copy and paste into a single Word document. Save the document as a PDF to prevent formatting issues .

*You must use a different graphic from chapter 8 for each situation.

Situations:

  1. Orlando submitted his quarterly report to his supervisor covering his monthly product sales:
    • October: $8,300
    • November: $7,900
    • December:        $9,200
  2. Helena used a pedometer to compare the number of miles she walked during a work week in the field to the miles she walked during her vacation while sightseeing.

Work Week:

  • May 25, 1.3
  • May 26, 1.0
  • May 27, 2.7
  • May 28, 1.6
  • May 29, 2.5

Vacation Week:

  • June 1, 0.6
  • June 2, 1.2
  • June 3, 0.9
  • June 4, 1.4
  • June 5, 2.0
  1. Denver submitted a report to his work study committee to account for the $1,250 stipend they gave him for his first month of college:
  • $850 books and educational supplies
  • $65 snacks and pizza
  • $210 Dorm accessories (rug, poster, bedding)
  • $46 entertainment
  • $40 parking fine
  • $39 unspent funds
  1. Cheyenne, head cashier for a local nursery, must show her co-workers the procedure for gaining approval for a customer check over $300: Inform the customer about store policy, verify the identity of the customer with a photo ID, ensure that the information on the check is correct, get two phone numbers from the customer, write your initials on the check, call the manager to approve the check.
  2. Lincoln’s supervisor delegated the task of training new employees where in the storage room standard supplies are located. The following items are the common supplies employees need to quickly find: copy paper, printer ink, toilet paper, paper towels, cleaning supplies and trash bags.
  3. Madison is designing a xeriscape brochure for her residential customers. She wants to show her customers the benefits of using xeriscape landscaping.
  4. Phoenix is giving a PowerPoint presentation on the growth of fish farms in his state. Five years ago, there were 120 farms; four years ago, 200 farms; three years ago, 250 farms; two years ago, 350 farms; and now there are 560 farms. He needs an attractive opening slide.
  5. Olympia is considering where to submit a job application after graduation. She is comparing job salary as one of her factors, and wants to visualize the comparison to help her with her decision.

Agriculture pilot (crop duster) $40,000

Regional airline pilot $60,000

Corporate pilot $45,000

Military pilot (2LT) $45,000

 

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Choosing Appropriate Graphics