Introduction for OJT Essay

Introduction for OJT Essay.

1. To pursue venerable career in a professional organization enable achieving company’s objectives of development, customer pleasure and service.

2. Together with assets for instance sincerity, truthfulness and struggle for excellence, add value and strength to the company, to empower the student or the team where he is a fraction of.

3. In quest of a position in a top business where the OJT is able to transmit the knowledge gained through bachelor’s degree. Determinedly deem in the principle of implementing duties with loyalty and courage.

4. To grow capably by giving skills to the association and vice versa. 5. To work in a demanding environment where skills and efforts is explored and familiarized the varied OJT fields, and understand potentials and add to the growth of the organization with inspiring performance.

6. To utilize knowledge and skills for the implementation of organizational goals.

PHILOSOPHY “It is the policy of the State to establish, develop, promote and perfect a sound and viable tax-exempt social security system suitable to the needs of the people throughout the Philippines which shall promote social justice and provide meaningful protection to members and their families against the hazards of disability, sickness, maternity, old age, death and other contingencies resulting in loss of income or financial burden.

Toward this end, the State shall endeavor to extend social security protection to workers and their beneficiaries.” (Section 2, RA 8282)

VISSION

“The SSS aims to develop and promote a viable, universal and equitable social security protection scheme through world-class service.” Viable. Social security protection shall be provided through generations. Universal. Social security protection shall be provided to all residents of the Philippines, citizens and non-citizens alike, regardless of creed, gender, age, geographic location and economic status, especially the disadvantaged, so that no one will become a burden to society. Equitable. Fair and uniform coverage shall be made available to all. Benefits shall be meaningful and able to sustain a decent standard of living. World-class service. Social security service that is prompt, accurate and courteous shall be provided to ensure total member satisfaction.

MISSION

To provide meaningful protection to the members and their families against contingencies resulting in the loss of income and financial burden and to contribute to the socio-economic development of the country through a viable social insurance program.

VALUES

“The SSS aims to institutionalize a corporate culture that instills the core values of Trust, Empowerment and Teamwork.”

On January 26, 1948, Pres. Manuel A. Roxas proposed a bill seeking to establish a social security system for wage earners and low-salaried employees. This was recommended to Congress in his State of the Nation Address. After the death of President Roxas, Pres. Elpidio Quirino created the Social Security Study Commission on July 7, 1948. The creation of the Commission was his first official act upon his assumption to office. Based on the report of the Study Commission, a draft of the Social Security Act was submitted to Congress. In 1954, Rep. Floro Crisologo, Senators Cipriano Primicias and Manuel Briones introduced bills based on the report of the Social Security Study Commission in the House of Representatives and in the Senate.

These bills were consolidated and enacted into Republic Act (RA) 1161, better known as the Social Security Act of 1954. However, business and labor groups objected to the Social Security Act resulting in a deferment of its implementation. In 1957, amendatory bills were presented in Congress. These bills were the bases of RA 1792, which amended the original Social Security Act. On September 1, 1957, the Social Security Act of 1954 or the Social Security Law (SS Law) was finally implemented, marking a significant milestone in the social security program. Thus, with the implementation of the SS law, the government also adopted the social insurance approach to social security, covering the employed segment of the labor force in the private sector. In 1993, household helpers earning at least P1,000 were included in the compulsory coverage of employees.

In 1980, some groups of self-employed persons were also required to contribute to the social security fund from which benefits are paid upon the occurrence of a contingency provided by law. Self-employed farmers and fisher folks were included in the program in 1992, while workers in the informal sector earning at least P 1,000 a month such as ambulant vendors and watch-your-car boys, were covered in 1995. The Social Security System (SSS) administers social security protection to workers in the private sector. On the other hand, the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) takes care of workers in the public sector.

The SSS administers two programs namely: 1. The Social Security Program; and 2. The Employees’ Compensation Program (EC) Social Security provides replacement income for workers in times of death, disability, sickness, maternity and old age. On May 1, 1997, Pres. Fidel V. Ramos signed RA 8282, further strengthening the SSS. Also known as the Social Security Act of 1997, it amended RA 1161, providing for better benefit packages, expansion of coverage, flexibility of investments, stiffer penalties for violators of the law, condonation of penalties of delinquent employers and the establishment of a voluntary provident fund for members.

The EC program, started in 1975, provides double compensation effective June 1984 to the worker when the illness, death, or accident occurs during work-related activities. EC benefits are granted only to members with employers. SSS used to administer the Medicare program for hospitalization and other medical needs of the private sector workers; and the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS), for the public sector workers.

However, with the passage of Republic Act 7875 or the National Health Insurance Act of 1995, the SSS and GSIS transferred the administration of the Medicare program to the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) for an integrated and comprehensive approach to health development effective July 1999. SSS retirement, death, and total disability pensioners prior to the effectivity of RA 7875 on March 4, 1995 are entitled to hospitalization benefits under Phil-Health. Pensioners upon the effectivity of RA 7875 on March 4, 1995 and thereafter are no longer covered except when they meet the qualification requirements set by PhilHealth.

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Introduction for OJT Essay

Filipinization Essay Essay

Filipinization Essay Essay.

Explain the impact brought about by the rise of Ilustrados and the Filipino Clergy in the Philippine Nationalist Movement and their influence to Rizal.

The most prominent Ilustrados were Graciano López Jaena, Marcelo H. del Pilar, Mariano Ponce, Antonio Luna and José Rizal, the Philippine national hero. Rizal’s novels Noli Me Tangere (“Touch Me Not”) and El filibusterismo (“The Subversive”) “exposed to the world the injustices imposed on Filipinos under the Spanish colonial regime”.

In the beginning, Rizal and his fellow Ilustrados preferred not to win independence from Spain, instead they yearned legal equality for bothPeninsulares and natives—Indios, Insulares, and mestizos, among others—in the colony.

Among the political, religious and economic reforms demanded by the Ilustrados were that “the Philippines be represented in the Cortes and be considered as a province of Spain” and “the secularization of the parishes.”

However, in 1872, nationalist sentiment grew strongest, when three Filipino priests, “charged with leading a military mutiny at an arsenal inCavite, near Manila”, were executed by the Spanish authorities.

The event and “other repressive acts outraged the Ilustrados. Because of his anti-clerical writings and activities, Rizal was executed on December 30, 1896. His execution propelled the Ilustrados . This also prompted unity among the Ilustrados and Andrés Bonifacio’s radical Katipunan. Philippine policies by the United States reinforced the dominant position of the Ilustrados within Filipino society. Friar estates were sold to the Ilustrados and most government positions were offered to them.

The Cavite Mutiny of 1872 was an uprising of military personnel of Fort San Felipe, the Spanish arsenal in Cavite, Philippines on January 20, 1872. Around 200 soldiers and laborers rose up in the belief that it would elevate to a national uprising. The mutiny was unsuccessful, and government soldiers executed many of the participants and began to crack down on a burgeoning nationalist movement. Many scholars believe that the Cavite Mutiny of 1872 was the beginning of Filipino nationalism that would eventually lead to the Philippine Revolution of 1896.

The primary cause of the mutiny is believed to be an order from Governor-General Rafael de Izquierdo to subject the soldiers of the Engineering and Artillery Corps to personal taxes, from which they were previously exempt. The taxes required them to pay a monetary sum as well as to perform forced labor called, “polo y servicio.” The mutiny was sparked on January 20, when the laborers received their pay and realized the taxes as well as the falla, the fine one paid to be exempt from forced labor, had been deducted from their salaries.

Secularization is a process by which the society is slowly transforming from that having close identification with the religious institution to a more separated relationship. This was considered to be the dawn of Philippine Nationalism, particularly after the execution of Gomburza.

The Gomburza headed the secularization movement. They advocated the right of the Filipino secular clergy over the assignment of parishes rather than giving them to the newly arrived Spanish friars in the country. The seculars were those who were not bound by monastic vows or rules. They were discriminated by the Dominicans, Jesuits, Franciscans and Recollects. The Filipino priests then were assigned as assistants to Spanish friars.

Secularism began in 1861 when the parishes of Mindanao originally managed by the Recollect friars were handed to the Jesuits. The Jesuits were expelled from the Philippines in 1768 because of the conflict they had between the European leaders. However, they returned to the country in 1861 and regain power over the Mindanao parishes from the Recollects who took over during their absence. The Recollects were bestowed the parishes of Manila and Cavite by the colonial government to appeased their loss. The original administrators of the parishes, the Filipino secular priests, naturally protested.

Sources:

http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php?title=Secularization

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilustrado

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1872_Cavite_mutiny

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filipino_nationalism

http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/28063.html

http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php?title=History_of_the_Philippines_(1521-1898)

Filipinization Essay Essay

Dekada 70 Essay

Dekada 70 Essay.

For the Philippines, the seventies was more than just a period of shaggy hair, bell-bottom jeans, platform shoes, and disco music. It represented the rise of the conjugal dictatorship of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos, a U.S.-sponsored regime characterized by military repression and wholesale human rights violations. Conversely, it was also the fecund period for the sociopolitical awakening and involvement of many Filipinos; the humus for the renowned religious-political event, the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution. [2] Dekada 70 journeys with the central character Amanda Bartolome (Vilma Santos), the reticent wife of an alpha-male husband, and the worrying mother of a boisterous all-male brood.

Thoroughly relegated to domesticity in a world slathered in testosterone, Amanda begins to undergo a transformation when her family becomes imbricated in the sociopolitical realities brought about by the Marcos dictatorship.

The declaration of Martial Law, the lifting of the writ of habeas corpus, the curfews and police searches, all these could have easily floated past Amanda’s head had her sons not found themselves caught in the crossfire between the government and the pro-democracy movements.

As one son after another faces the oppressive forces of the dictatorship, Amanda gradually realizes that the personal is political. While chanting slogans for sociopolitical change, she finds her own voice and comes to terms with the fullness of her own person. [3] It is notable that in the film, the divine presence is sublimated in the refusal to acquiesce to societal structures that perpetuate injustice. The characters’ eyes are opened to the dehumanizing impact of such oppressive structures and they join in the prophetic denunciation of what they have identified as ‘not-God.’

This importantly resonates with the praxical imperative associated with theologies of liberation, which configure God as imbricated in the collective protest of the oppressed. Amanda then, in her ‘conversion to justice,’ can be seen as synechdochic of the epiphanous ‘becoming’ of Filipinos as a true people of the eucharist. [4] Based on an awarded novel of the same title, Dekada 70 essays Amanda’s personal and political journey is a patient navigation of each year of the seventies. To director Roňo’s credit, the film has a clear focus and steadily gets to its point through engaging but inobtrusive camerawork. The politically-charged scenes are strident enough to be visually disturbing, yet tempered enough to work on a more psychological level.

[5] There are touches of seventies style Filipino humor that foreign audiences might miss; they effectively establish that this is a real, average Filipino family trying to navigate through the eye of the political storm. The acting is generally impressive, most especially that of lead actress Santos, who gives a luminous, sensitive performance. Santos essays the transformation of Amanda so effectively that we do see clearly at the end of the film that there has been a fundamental change in her character. [6]

If there is something to be faulted about the film, it is Roňo’s failure to keep melodramatic moments in check. The funeral sequence of one of Amanda’s sons, for instance, becomes an over-extended session of copious tears. The rich story material of Dekada 70 could do away with such ‘in your face’ paroxysms, which only work to dull the film’s cutting edge political trajectory. [7] Nonetheless, it cannot be denied that Roňo had created a noteworthy, epic-scale Filipino film, and on a Third World budget at that. It also cannot be denied that Roňo had not forgotten the sentence of history on his home country. [8] Neither will Filipino audiences.

Dekada 70 Essay

The Spanish Colonization in the Philippines Essay

The Spanish Colonization in the Philippines Essay.

The Philippines was very lucky because our country was rich in natural resources. And that is the reason why many foreign countries had colonized our country. Spain is one of the foreign countries that colonized our country for more than three hundred years. They are the reason why Filipinos experienced suffered, hardship, persecution etc. during their colonization. But the Spanish had also contributes good things in our country specially to us Filipinos. The Spanish colonization in the Philippines lead to us to make some questions in our mind on how does the Filipino survived? Even though they experienced the inhumanity of the Spaniards.

We can say that the Filipino during the time of the Spanish was so very poor and pity because the Spaniards treated the Filipino people not as human being but as their slaves. They abused the Filipino. The lives of the Filipinos during the Spanish colonization was so very difficult. They never experienced the “freedom”.

Even though there are many negative things that the Spaniards given to the Filipinos but there is still positive contributions that the Spanish government given to us.

And one of this positive contribution is their culture. The Spanish people introduced us what are their culture like they introduced us their Latin alphabet, the art of painting, the appearance of Theocratic Literature, the persistence of folk and colonial art and the Hispanic music and western musical instrument. This contributions brought such good things in the Filipinos because this things helped us to improved our culture and ourselves. The Spanish government also helped the Filipino in their educational situation. The Spanish teach the Filipino children not only about academics but also religious things. They teach them on how to become a God-fearing person. And also the Spanish government founded different schools.

There were primary, secondary, tertiary schools that the Spanish built in our country like the Ateneo, the University of Santo Tomas (UST), the Santa Isabel and many more. And we are very thankful because those schools were still teaching the Filipino people until now. And also the Spanish government transformed the Filipino people socially. Like the hispanization of Filipino surnames. Also the Spanish introduced to the Filipino to used the stone in building construction so that the bahay kubo was transformed into bahay na bato with balcony and we think that was the style of some houses today. And they also changed the mode of Filipino dressing. The Spanish introduced the wearing western coat and trousers or amiricana, which replaced their traditional jacket and bahag for men.

They also encourage the Filipino men to stop using the putong and instead wore hats and they even started wearing slippers and shoes instead of going around barefoot. And for women they started using saya and camisa, replacing their traditional sarong. The women also learned to used manton de manila or shawls and handkerchief and also like the men, the women started using slippers and shoes. The Spanish also influenced us to celebrate religious feasts honoring patron Saints because this is the consequence for being converted into Catholicism. The Spanish changed the lives of Filipino. Even though the Spanish was inhumanity but the Filipino was still lucky because the Spanish people exerted efforts to implement our country by sharing to us the way of their living and those things contributed a lot to us Filipino.

And we also give thanks to the Spanish because they converted the Filipino into Catholicism because if the Spain had not succeeded to colonized our country, then our country would have been a Muslim nation now. Catholicism is the most important contribution that the Spanish given to us. The Spanish colonization in the Philippines brought such poverty, violence, misery to us Filipino. But it also contributes us a lot of good things. They improved and helped our country in many ways.

Even though the Filipino experienced the inhumanity of the Spaniards but still they influenced us the way of their living and until today we still used and make those influences in our daily lives. The only thing that we can say in the Spanish colonization is that we felt different emotions. We felt angry because the Spaniards abused the Filipino they treated them as slaves. We felt sad because their are many Filipinos sacrificed their own lives just for the sake of the country man. And for the freedom of our country. And also we felt happy because the Spaniards contributes many good things in our country, the Philippines.

The Spanish Colonization in the Philippines Essay

Related Studies for Online Shopping Essay

Related Studies for Online Shopping Essay.

Sulit.com.ph is a classified ads website that caters primarily to Philippine market. It is an online marketplace where people buy and sell a wide variety of goods, products, and services under different categories such as real estate, automotives, careers, business products and services, and many more among Filipino individuals and business groups all over the world.[3] Launched on September 11, 2006, the free online classified ads website was named Sulit.com.ph for 2 reasons: (1) “Sulit” is a Filipino word that means “worth it” in English, describing the affordability of items being sold by the site’s members; and (2) Sulit is an acronym for “Super Low Internet Trading.

In addition to the buy and sell platform, Sulit.com.ph also provides an online community among Filipino web users. Through the Sulit.com.ph forum, members interact with one another about various topics including business, lifestyle, current events, and health among many others. Thus, Sulit.com.ph can also be translated to “Sulit Community in the Philippines.

” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulit.com.ph

AyosDito.ph is an online classified-ads website catering to the Philippine market. It is owned and operated by 701Search Pte., Ltd., which is a joint venture between media giantsSingapore Press Holdings and Schibsted. Launched in March 2009,[2] AyosDito offers free posting of ads for items such as properties, cars, computers, cellphones, electronic gadgets, food, and even jobs.

The phrase “Ayos Dito” is Tagalog for “Ok here”.
Despite the rather plain site layout and design, people generally find the website very fast and simple to use.[3] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AyosDito.ph

Related Studies for Online Shopping Essay

Mining in the Philippines Essay

Mining in the Philippines Essay.

A. Introduction

The Philippine Government believes that a well-developed minerals industry is an option that can catalyze economic development and community empowerment. Minerals are part of its national patrimony, hence there is a big responsibility to maximize the benefits that can be derived from their utilization with due regard to the protection of the environment and without sacrificing the interests of communities.

The legal and administrative framework governing the minerals industry in the Philippines is contained in Republic Act No. 7942 (otherwise known as the Philippine Mining Act of 1995) and given flesh by its revised implementing rules and regulations (Administrative Order No.

96-40) and its subsequent amendments. These policies advocate the sustainable development of mineral resources in the country.

While both the Mining Act and its regulations provide a strong focus on environmental and social management, they continue to be the subject of debate by some non-government organizations who are questioning the compatibility of extraction and utilization of minerals with sustainable development.

Also, they have questioned the constitutionality of the major provisions of the Mining Act governing the participation of foreign-owned corporations in the exploration, development and utilization of these mineral resources by filing a case at the Supreme Court in February, 1997.

After eight years of study, the high court initially decided to sustain the charge of the contesting parties. However, after successful presentation of arguments by Government and industry on the merits of allowing foreign investors to participate in the development of the minerals industry, the case was finally resolved in December 1, 2004 when the high court reversed its earlier decision and upheld the constitutionality of the contested provisions in the Mining Act. With this legal impediment removed, exploration and development activities in the Philippine minerals industry is due to become vibrant once again.

Compared to previous policy regimes on mining, the Mining Act calls for a greater responsibility from Government and the industry. Mining companies are expected to work closer with stakeholders to improve the quality of life within the communities where they operate. As regulator, Government, on the other hand, has the responsibility of establishing and maintaining the enabling environment for a sustainable development of the industry.

Minerals development in the country is led by no less than the President of the Republic of the Philippines. In her declaration of a policy shift in mining “from tolerance to promotion”, minerals development was elevated among the priority economic activities in the country during her presidential tenure. Early this year, she signed Executive Order No. 270 which approved a national policy agenda on revitalizing the minerals industry based on the principles of sustainable development. From this order, a Minerals Action Plan (MAP) was subsequently formulated by Government to chart a roadmap for the future development of the minerals industry. Minerals development is now an important component of the Medium Term Philippine Development Plan 2004-2010.

Mining in the Philippines Essay

The Inclusion of Transgender Women in the Miss Universe Essay

The Inclusion of Transgender Women in the Miss Universe Essay.

In a beauty-pageant-crazy country like the Philippines, the annual Miss Universe pageantry is a most-awaited event for many Filipinos. It is that time when many Filipino people gravitate towards their TV sets with their eyes wide open as though entranced on the pageant events as they unfold. Probably next to boxing, the Miss Universe pageant is the most-widely watched worldwide event in the Philippines. As evidence of the country’s penchant for this event, the country has fared quite well as far as producing winners is concerned.

Gloria Diaz copped the coveted crown in 1969. Margie Moran duplicated the feat in 1973. And not a few others almost brought home the crown in their respective attempts: Miriam Quiambao landed 1st runner-up in 1999; Desiree Verdadero made it to the final 5 and landed 3rd runner-up in 1983. Most recently, Venus Raj won 4th runner-up last year and Shamcey Supsup upped the ante by landing 3rd runner-up this year. The Miss Universe pageant of pulchritude draws everybody’s attention.

Any news about it is lapped up by both local and international media.

This beauty competition is indeed newsworthy – even by itself. A recent turn of events, however, has sent the entire beauty pageant-conscious members of the populace even more curious and intrigued by the recent amendments to the pageant rules. The pageant’s governing body – with its owner, Mr. Donald Trump nodding in approval himself – has decided in favor of a transgender woman from Canada by allowing her to compete among biologically-born female contestants in the said pageant. Subsequently, sentiments from different sectors go abuzz. Some give their nods of approval.

Others though sneered. The Miss Universe beauty pageant continues to stew in controversy over the appeals of disqualified Canadian candidate Jenna Talackova, a transgender woman, with a former Miss Universe finalist rejecting the notion of contestants who sport male genitals. The Miss Universe Organization (MUO) announced that they have lifted the disqualification and has decided to reinstate Talackova in the competition. The organization also said that they are going to revamp the pageant rules to accommodate transgender women in the contest beginning 2013.

According to MUO President Paula Shugart, who was quoted in an article published on the official website of the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Discrimination (GLAAD): “We want to give credit where credit is due, and the decision to include transgender women in our beauty competitions is a result of our ongoing discussions with GLAAD and not Jenna’s legal representation, which if anything, delayed the process. “We have a long history of supporting equality for all women, and this was something we took very seriously.

Is it fair including transgender women in the Miss Universe pageant or in any beauty pageants that originally allow only biological females, for that matter? Being a predominantly Catholic/Christian country, what is the impact of the inclusion of the transgender woman in the Miss Universe pageant to the population, especially the youth? How do different people react to this recent development? What do people think about the decision of the Miss Universe body to include a transgender woman in its competition?

The Inclusion of Transgender Women in the Miss Universe Essay

Same Sex Marriage in the Philippines Essay

Same Sex Marriage in the Philippines Essay.

Same-sex couples should be allowed to publicly celebrate their commitment in the same way as heterosexual couples. [40] The Human Rights Campaign Foundation states that many same-sex couples “want the right to legally marry [and] honor their relationship in the greatest way our society has to offer…”

Same-sex couples should have access to the same benefits enjoyed by heterosexual married couples. Many benefits are only available to married couples, such as hospital visitation during an illness, taxation and inheritance rights, access to family health coverage, and protection in the event of the relationship ending.

[6] An Oct. 2, 2009 analysis by the New York Times estimates that a same-sex couple denied marriage benefits will incur an additional $41,196 to $467,562 in expenses over their lifetime compared to a married heterosexual couple. [7]

The concept of “traditional marriage” being defined as one man and one woman is historically inaccurate. Given the prevalence of modern and ancient examples of family arrangements based on polygamy, communal child-rearing, the use of concubines and mistresses and the commonality of prostitution, heterosexual monogamy can be considered “unnatural” in evolutionary terms.

[3]

Marriage is redefined as society’s attitudes evolve, and the majority of Americans now support gay marriage. Interracial marriage was illegal in many US states until a 1967 Supreme Court decision. Coverture, where a woman’s legal rights and economic identity were subsumed by her husband upon marriage, was commonplace in 19th century America. No-fault divorce has changed the institution of marriage since its introduction in California on Jan. 1, 1970. With a May 2013 Gallup poll showing 53% of Americans supporting gay marriage, it is time for the definition of marriage to evolve once again. [72]

Gay marriage is protected by the Constitution’s commitments to liberty and equality. The US Supreme Court ruled in 1974’s Cleveland Board of Education v. LaFleur that the “freedom of personal choice in matters of marriage and family life is one of the liberties protected by the Due Process Clause.” US District Judge Vaughn Walker wrote on Aug. 4, 2010 that Prop. 8 in California banning gay marriage was “unconstitutional under both the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses.” [41]

Denying same-sex couples the right to marry stigmatizes gay and lesbian families as inferior and sends the message that it is acceptable to discriminate against them. The Massachusetts Supreme Court wrote in an opinion to the state Senate on Feb. 3, 2004 that offering civil unions was not an acceptable alternative to gay marriage because “…it is a considered choice of language that reflects a demonstrable assigning of same-sex, largely homosexual, couples to second-class status.” [42]

Gay marriages can bring financial gain to state and local governments. Revenue from gay marriage comes from marriage licenses, higher income taxes (the so-called “marriage penalty”), and decreases in costs for state benefit programs. [4] The Comptroller for New York City found that legalizing gay marriage would bring $142 million to the city’s economy and $184 million to the state’s economy over three years. [43]

Gay marriage would make it easier for same-sex couples to adopt, providing stable homes for children who would otherwise be left in foster care. [68] In the US, 100,000 children are waiting to be adopted. [44] A longitudinal study published in Pediatrics on June 7, 2010 found that children of lesbian mothers were rated higher than children of heterosexual parents in social and academic competence and had fewer social problems. [45] A July 2010 study found that children of gay fathers were “as well-adjusted as those adopted by heterosexual parents.” [46] As Washington Post columnist Ezra Klein argues, “We should be begging gay couples to adopt children. We should see this as a great boon that gay marriage could bring to kids who need nothing more than two loving parents.” [68]

Marriage provides both physical and psychological health benefits, and banning gay marriage increases rates of psychological disorders. [5] The American Psychological Association, American Psychiatric Association, and others wrote in a Sep. 2007 amicus brief, “…allowing same-sex couples to marry would give them access to the social support that already facilitates and strengthens heterosexual marriages, with all of the psychological and physical health benefits associated with that support.” [47] A 2010 analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health found that after their states had banned gay marriage, gay, lesbian and bisexual people suffered a 37% increase in mood disorders, a 42% increase in alcohol-use disorders, and a 248% increase in generalized anxiety disorders. [69]

Legalizing gay marriage will not harm heterosexual marriages or “family values,” and society will continue to function successfully. A study published on Apr. 13, 2009 in Social Science Quarterly found that “[l]aws permitting same-sex marriage or civil unions have no adverse effect on marriage, divorce, and abortion rates, [or] the percent of children born out of wedlock…” [48] The Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association found that more than a century of research has shown “no support whatsoever for the view that either civilization or viable social orders depend upon marriage as an exclusively heterosexual institution. Rather, anthropological research supports the conclusion that a vast array of family types, including families built upon same-sex partnerships, can contribute to stable and humane societies.” [8]

Marriage is a secular institution which should not be limited by religious objections to gay marriage. Nancy Cott, PhD, testified in Perry v. Schwarzenegger that “[c]ivil law has always been supreme in defining and regulating marriage” and that religious leaders are accustomed to performing marriages only because the state has given them that authority. [41]

Gay marriage legalization is correlated with lower divorce rates, while gay marriage bans are correlated with higher divorce rates. Massachusetts, which became the first state to legalize gay marriage in 2004, had the lowest divorce rate in the country in 2008. Its divorce rate declined 21% between 2003 and 2008. Alaska, which altered its constitution to prohibit gay marriage in 1998, saw a 17.2% increase in its divorce rate. The seven states with the highest divorce rates between 2003 and 2008 all had constitutional prohibitions to gay marriage. [2]

If the reason for marriage is strictly reproduction, infertile couples would not be allowed to marry. Ability or desire to create offspring has never been a qualification for marriage. George Washington, often referred to as “the Father of Our Country,” did not have children with his wife Martha Custis, and neither did four other married US presidents have children with their wives. [9]

Same-sex marriage is a civil right. The 1967 Supreme Court case Loving v. Virginia confirmed that marriage is “one of the basic civil rights of man,” [60] and same-sex marriages should receive the same protections given to interracial marriages by that ruling. The NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), on May 19, 2012, named same-sex marriage as “one of the key civil rights struggles of our time.” [61] CON Gay Marriage

The institution of marriage has traditionally been defined as between a man and a woman. In the Oct. 15, 1971 decision Baker v. Nelson, the Supreme Court of Minnesota found that “The institution of marriage as a union of man and woman, uniquely involving the procreation and rearing of children within a family, is as old as the book of Genesis.” [49]

Allowing gay couples to wed will further weaken the institution of marriage. Traditional marriage is already threatened with high divorce rates (between 40% and 50%) and with 40.6% of babies being born to unmarried mothers in 2008. Allowing same-sex couples to marry would further weaken the institution. [50] [51] As argued by Ryan T. Anderson, William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and a Free Society at The Heritage Foundation, “In recent decades, marriage has been weakened by a revisionist view that is more about adults’ desires than children’s needs… Redefining marriage to include same-sex relationships is the culmination of this revisionism, and it would leave emotional intensity as the only thing that sets marriage apart from other bonds.” [70]

Gay marriage could potentially lead down a “slippery slope” giving people in polygamous, incestuous, bestial, and other nontraditional relationships the right to marry. [10] Glen Lavy, JD, senior counsel with the Alliance Defense Fund, argued in a May 21, 2008 Los Angeles Times Op-Ed, “The movement for polygamy and polyamory is poised to use the successes of same-sex couples as a springboard for further de-institutionalizing marriage.” [11] In April 2013, Slate published a plea for legal polygamy by writer Jillian Keenan: “Just like heterosexual marriage is no better or worse than homosexual marriage, marriage between two consenting adults is not inherently more or less ‘correct’ than marriage among three (or four, or six) consenting adults.” [71]

People should not have their tax dollars used to support something they believe is wrong. Gay marriage would entitle gay couples to typical marriage benefits including claiming a tax exemption for a spouse, receiving social security payments from a deceased spouse, and coverage by a spouse’s health insurance policy. On Dec. 17, 2009, the Congressional Budget Office estimated that the cost to the federal government of extending employment benefits to same-sex domestic partners of certain federal employees (making no mention of additional costs such as Social Security and inheritance taxes) would be $596 million in mandatory spending and $302 million in discretionary spending between 2010 and 2019. [37]

Gay marriage may lead to more children being raised in same-sex households, which are not an optimum environment because children need both a mother and father. Girls who are raised apart from their fathers are reportedly at higher risk for early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy. [52] Children without a mother are deprived of the emotional security and unique advice that mothers provide. An Apr. 2001 study published in American Sociological Review suggesed that children with lesbian or gay parents are more likely to engage in homosexual behavior. [53] In the 1997 book Growing up in a Lesbian Family: Effects on Child Development, Fiona Tasker, PhD, and Susan Golombok, PhD, observed that 25% of sampled young adults raised by lesbian mothers had engaged in a homoerotic relationship, compared to 0% of sampled young adults raised by heterosexual mothers. [13]

Gay marriage will accelerate the assimilation of gays into mainstream heterosexual culture to the detriment of the homosexual community. The gay community has created its own vibrant culture. By reducing the differences in opportunities and experiences between gay and heterosexual people, this unique culture may cease to exist. As M.V. Lee Badgett, PhD summarizes, “marriage means adopting heterosexual forms of family and giving up distinctively gay family forms and perhaps even gay and lesbian culture.” [14]

The institution of marriage is sexist and oppressive; it should not be expanded but weakened. Paula Ettelbrick, JD, Professor of Law and Women’s Studies, wrote in 1989, “Marriage runs contrary to two of the primary goals of the lesbian and gay movement: the affirmation of gay identity and culture and the validation of many forms of relationships.” [15] The leaders of the Gay Liberation Front in New York said in July 1969, “We expose the institution of marriage as one of the most insidious and basic sustainers of the system. The family is the microcosm of oppression.” [16]

Same-sex marriage has undermined the institution of marriage in Scandinavia. Sweden began offering same-sex couples benefits in 1987, followed by Denmark in 1989 and Norway in 1993. According to a Feb. 29, 2004 report by Stanley Kurtz, PhD, from 1990 to 2000, Norway’s out-of-wedlock birthrate rose from 39% to 50% and Sweden’s rose from 47% to 55%. Unmarried parenthood in Denmark rose 25% during the 1990s, and approximately 60% of first born Danish children have unmarried parents. As Kurtz states, “Marriage is slowly dying in Scandinavia.” [17]

Marriage is a privilege, not a right. Society can choose to endorse certain types of sexual arrangements and give support in the form of benefits to these arrangements. Marriage was created to allow society to support heterosexual couples in procreation and society can choose not to give the same benefits to same-sex couples. [18]

Marriage should not be extended to same-sex couples because they cannot produce children together. Allowing gay marriage would only further shift the purpose of marriage from producing and raising children to adult gratification. [19]

Marriage is a religious rite between one man and one woman. According to a July 31, 2003 statement from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and approved by Pope John Paul II, marriage “was established by the Creator with its own nature, essential properties and purpose. No ideology can erase from the human spirit the certainty that marriage exists solely between a man and a woman…” [54]

Gay marriage is incompatible with the beliefs, sacred texts, and traditions of many religious groups. The Catholic Church, Presbyterian Church, Islam, United Methodist Church, Southern Baptist Convention, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, National Association of Evangelicals, and American Baptist Churches USA all oppose same-sex marriage. Expanding marriage to include same-sex couples may lead to churches being forced to marry couples and children being taught in school that same-sex marriage is the same as opposite-sex marriage. [12]

Same-sex marriage is not a civil rights issue, and conflating the issue with interracial marriage is misleading. Matthew D. Staver, JD, Dean of the Liberty University School of Law, explained: “The unifying characteristics of the protected classes within the Civil Rights Act of 1964 include (1) a history of longstanding, widespread discrimination, (2) economic disadvantage, and (3) immutable characteristics… ‘Sexual orientation’ does not meet any of the three objective criteria shared by the historically protected civil rights cat

Same Sex Marriage in the Philippines Essay

The Philippine’s Ethnic Tribes Essay

The Philippine’s Ethnic Tribes Essay.

The indigenous peoples of the Philippines consist of a large number of indigenous ethnic groups living in the country. They are the descendants of the original inhabitants of thePhilippines who have managed to resist centuries of Spanish and United States colonization and in the process have retained their customs and traditions. [1]CThe Philippine islands are inhabited by a number of different ethnic groups. The majority of the population is composed of ethnolinguistic groups whose languages are Austronesianalso known as Malayo-Polynesian in origin.

Many of these groups converted toChristianity, particularly the lowland-coastal groups, and adopted many foreign elements of culture. These ethnic groups include the Cebuano, Ilocano, Pangasinense, Kapampangan,Tagalog, Bicolano, Waray, Surigaonon and Hiligaynon also called Ilonggo. In Mindanao, there are indigenous groups who practice Islam. The Spanish called themMoros after the Moors (despite no resemblance or cultural ties to them apart from their religion).

In some highland areas of Mindanao, there are mountain-dwelling ethnic groups collectively known as lumad. These people do not practice Islam, and maintain their animistic beliefs and traditions.

The Negrito are a pre-Mongoloid people who migrated from mainland Asia and were one of the earliest human beings to settle the Philippines, around 30,000 years ago. [citation needed] (The known first being that of the people of the Callao Man remains) The Negrito population are estimated to number around 30,000.

Their tribal groups include the Ati, and the Aeta. Their ways of life remain mostly free from Western and Islamic influences. Scholars study them to try to understand pre-Hispanic culture. Most Filipinos are Malayo-Polynesian, another term for Austronesian. Other ethnic groups form a minority in the Philippine population. These include those of Japanese, Han Chinese, Indians, Americans, Spanish, Europeans, and other ethnic groups from other countries. Mixed-race individuals are known as Filipino mestizo.

The Philippine’s Ethnic Tribes Essay

Sky View Restobar Essay

Sky View Restobar Essay.

Restobar is a business establishment which prepares and serves foods, drinks and also alcoholic drinks to customers in return for money, either paid before the meal, after the meal, or with a running tab. There are many restobar already these days. It gives more satisfaction to customers due of many foods, drinks, and services that it offers. Putting these restobars near in the tourist spots give it more attraction to or invites tourist or customers. The City of Tagaytay is a component city in the province of Cavite, in the Philippines.

It is one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations because of outstanding scenery and cooler climate provided by its high altitude. Tagaytay overlooks Taal Lake in Batangas and provides one of the iconic views of the Philippines, the view of Taal Volcano Island in the middle of the lake, viewable from several vantage points in the city. Tagaytay is relatively close to the capital city of Manila, only 55 km (34 mi) away via Aguinaldo Highway, providing an easy escape for the locals from the heat of the big city.

Tagaytay City has a total land area of 66. 1 km2 (26 sq mi) which represents about 4. 37% of the total area of the Province of Cavite. It lies within 120° 56′ longitude and 14° 6′ latitude and overlooks Manila Bay to the North, Taal Volcano and Lake to the south and Laguna de Bay to the east. Tagaytay City’s subtropical-like climate is characterized by relatively low temperature, low humidity and abundant rainfall.

The City is endowed with a cool and invigorating climate with an average temperature of 22. 7 °C (72. 9 °F). With its high elevation, the city could be misty at times and is relatively cooler during the months of December, January and February. Like most areas in the province of Cavite, the city has two pronounced seasons: dry from November to April and wet during the rest of the year. The climate has made the city ideal for sports, picnics, conferences, honeymoons, country homes, and spiritual retreats.

The city of Tagaytay is a favorite tourist attraction among local and foreign visitors seeking respite from the humid weather in the lowlands with several tourist establishments providing food and accommodations, some with scenic views of the the Japanese Friendship Garden, One Destination night life hub, scenery view in the People’s Park In The Sky, Pink Sister’s Convent, Tagaytay Highlands, Tagaytay Picnic Grove, Taal Lake and Volcano. This view supports Tagaytay’s main industry, which is tourism. The lake is also popular for its oddity – a lake with a volcano with a lake within, and an island in the middle of that small lake.

Sky View Restobar Essay