The Thriving Index questionnaire (TI) to assess your strengths and work orientations

The Thriving Index questionnaire (TI) to assess your strengths and work orientations.

This is your personalised link to complete the assessments. This link consists of two assessments that include:

  1. The Thriving Index questionnaire (TI) assesses your strengths and work orientations. This questionnaire is untimed but takes an average of 20 minutes to complete. To prepare, think about your strengths and how you tend to behave at university when working alone or with groups.
  2. Cognitive assessments which will include numerical, error detection and reasoning tests. The assessment is timed at 15 minutes. During the session itself, you will be required to complete several practice questions. As it is a timed assessment, the general rule is to work quickly and accurately. 

Instructions

  • All instructions will be given to you when you log into the platform, and before each exercise or scenario begins.
  • In total, the assessments will take around 30-40 minutes to complete.
  • Make sure you’re in a quiet place where you will not be disturbed before logging into the assessments
  • Please use Google Chrome to log into the URL

APA Format

The Thriving Index questionnaire (TI) to assess your strengths and work orientations


The Thriving Index is a strengths-based psychometric assessment that measures 34 factors across 6 dimensions:

  • Agility: The ability to adapt to change and uncertainty.
  • Grit: The ability to persevere in the face of challenges.
  • Resilience: The ability to bounce back from setbacks.
  • Growth mindset: The belief that one’s abilities can be developed with effort.
  • Self-efficacy: The belief in one’s ability to succeed.
  • Courage: The willingness to take risks and face challenges.
  • Optimism: The belief that good things will happen.

Organizations use the Thriving Index to select and develop employees and leaders. Individuals can also use it to gain insights into their own strengths and weaknesses.

The Thriving Index is a 30-minute online assessment. It consists of a series of statements that you rate on a scale of 1 to 5. Your scores are then compared to a database of over 1 million people to generate a report that provides insights into your strengths, weaknesses, and potential for growth.

The Thriving Index is a valuable tool for anyone who wants to understand themselves better and achieve their full potential. If you are interested in taking the Thriving Index, you can find more information on the Talent Enterprise website.

Here are some of the benefits of taking the Thriving Index:

  • Gain insights into your strengths and weaknesses.
  • Identify potential blindspots.
  • Understand your growth potential.
  • Set goals for personal and professional development.
  • Make informed decisions about your career.
  • Improve your performance at work.
  • Build stronger relationships.
  • Live a more fulfilling life.

If you are interested in taking the Thriving Index, I encourage you. It is a valuable tool that can help you achieve your full potential.

Thriving Index Questionnaire Practice Test

Here is a practice test for the Thriving Index questionnaire:

Agility

  1. I am able to adapt to change quickly and easily.
  2. I am comfortable with ambiguity and uncertainty.
  3. I am good at seeing new possibilities in old situations.
  4. I am able to learn new things quickly.
  5. I am able to think outside the box.

Grit

  1. I am able to persevere in the face of challenges.
  2. I am not easily discouraged.
  3. I am able to stay focused on my goals even when things get tough.
  4. I am willing to work hard to achieve my goals.
  5. I am not afraid to take risks.

Resilience

  1. I am able to bounce back from setbacks quickly.
  2. I am able to learn from my mistakes.
  3. I am able to stay positive in the face of adversity.
  4. I am able to find strength in my weaknesses.
  5. I am able to see the silver lining in every situation.

Growth mindset

  1. I believe that my abilities can be developed with effort.
  2. I am always looking for ways to improve my skills and knowledge.
  3. I am not afraid to challenge myself.
  4. I am willing to take feedback on my performance.
  5. I am always learning and growing.

Self-efficacy

  1. I believe in my ability to succeed.
  2. I am confident in my abilities.
  3. I am not afraid to take risks.
  4. I am willing to put in the effort to achieve my goals.
  5. I am not easily discouraged.

Courage

  1. I am willing to take risks.
  2. I am not afraid to stand up for what I believe in.
  3. I am not afraid to face my fears.
  4. I am willing to speak up when I see something wrong.
  5. I am not afraid to be myself.

Optimism

  1. I believe that good things will happen.
  2. I am always looking for the silver lining.
  3. I am able to see the positive in every situation.
  4. I am not easily discouraged.
  5. I am always hopeful for the future.

These are just a few examples of the types of questions that you might be asked on the Thriving Index questionnaire. The actual questions will vary, but they will all be designed to assess your strengths and weaknesses in the six dimensions of agility, grit, resilience, growth mindset, self-efficacy, courage, and optimism.

If you are interested in taking the Thriving Index, you can find more information on the Talent Enterprise website.

FAQs

How do you introduce a survey questionnaire?

To introduce a survey questionnaire, you should first explain the purpose of the survey and how the data collected will be used. Then, provide clear instructions on how to complete the questionnaire, including any time or page limits. Additionally, it would be best to inform participants of their rights, such as the option to skip or not answer certain questions and the confidentiality of their responses. Finally, you can thank them for participating and assure them that their feedback is valuable and appreciated.

How do you create a questionnaire?

Creating a questionnaire involves several steps:

  1. Define the research objectives and questions: Determine what information you want to gather and what specific questions will help you achieve your objectives.
  2. Determine the format and type of questionnaire: Decide whether to use a structured (closed-ended) or unstructured (open-ended) questionnaire and whether it will be in a paper or digital format.
  3. Design the questionnaire: Use clear and simple language and avoid double-barreled or leading questions. Also, consider the order of questions and use appropriate response scales, such as Likert or multiple choice.
  4. Test and pilot the questionnaire: Pretest the questionnaire on a small group of individuals similar to the target population to identify any issues or ambiguities.
  5. Revise and finalize the questionnaire: Make necessary revisions based on feedback from the pilot test, and ensure that the questionnaire is easy to understand and complete.
  6. Administer the questionnaire: Decide on the appropriate data collection method, such as mail, phone, or online survey, and follow the sample design.
  7. Analyze and interpret the data collected: Use appropriate statistical techniques to analyze the data and draw conclusions based on the research objectives.

It’s important to remember that creating a questionnaire is an iterative process, and you may need to go back and revise it several times before it is ready for use.

How do I get a condo questionnaire?

There are a few ways to obtain a condo questionnaire, depending on the purpose of your survey and the type of information you seek. Here are a few options:

  1. Contact the Condo Association: You can reach out to the management or board of the Condo Association and ask if they have a questionnaire or survey they use to gather information from residents.
  2. Search online: Look for sample condo questionnaires or templates online. Websites such as SurveyMonkey or Google Forms offer templates that you can customize for your own use.
  3. Hire a professional survey company: Hire a professional survey company that specializes in creating surveys for Condo associations. They will be able to create a questionnaire specifically tailored to your needs.
  4. Create your own questionnaire: You can create your own questionnaire using a survey software or word processing program. Be sure to include questions that pertain to the specific concerns of the Condo owners and residents.

It’s important to note that when creating or using a questionnaire, you should make sure that it is legally compliant and obtain consent from the parties you are surveying.

How do you conclude a questionnaire?

To conclude a questionnaire, you can include a closing section summarizing the main points covered in the survey and thank the participants for their time and feedback. Here are a few things to include in your closing section:

  1. A thank-you statement: Express your appreciation for the participants’ time and effort in completing the questionnaire.
  2. A summary of the main points: Provide a brief summary of the main points covered in the questionnaire and the purpose of the survey.
  3. Confidentiality statement: Reassure participants that their responses will be kept confidential and used for research purposes only.
  4. Contact information: Provide contact information for participants who have further questions or concerns.
  5. Closing thoughts or next steps: Provide any additional information or next steps that may be relevant to the participants.

It’s also important to remind participants that their participation is voluntary and they can choose not to complete the survey or skip any questions they don’t feel comfortable answering.

In addition, you might want to include any incentive for completing the survey, if you’re offering any, and a final clear statement that the survey is complete.

Are questionnaires qualitative or quantitative data?

Questionnaires can be used to gather qualitative and quantitative data, depending on the type of questions included and the questionnaire format.

Quantitative questionnaires typically use closed-ended questions, such as multiple-choice or Likert scale. These questions can be easily quantified and analyzed using statistical methods to generate numerical data. This data type is useful for describing a population’s patterns, relationships, and trends.

On the other hand, qualitative questionnaires typically use open-ended questions, such as fill-in-the-blank or short-answer questions. These questions allow participants to provide detailed, unstructured responses. The data generated from these questions are useful for understanding the participants’ attitudes, beliefs, and experiences.

It’s worth mentioning that some questionnaires can include a combination of both types of questions, which would be called mixed-methods questionnaires. This type of questionnaire allows for gathering both numerical data and text data at the same time. It can be useful to triangulate the data in order to have a more comprehensive understanding of the research topic.

What types of cardiovascular disease are important to identify when developing a pre-activity health screening questionnaire?

When developing a pre-activity health screening questionnaire for cardiovascular disease, it is important to identify the following types of conditions:

  1. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of cardiovascular disease caused by plaque buildup in the coronary arteries, leading to angina (chest pain) or heart attack.
  2. Hypertension (high blood pressure) increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease.
  3. Arrhythmias are abnormal heart rhythms that can cause palpitations, lightheadedness, or fainting.
  4. Heart failure occurs when the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs.
  5. Valvular heart disease is when one or more heart valves malfunction.
  6. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): This is caused by narrowed or blocked blood vessels in the legs and can lead to pain, cramping, or fatigue in the legs.
  7. Aortic aneurysm: This is a bulging in the wall of the aorta, the major blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body, which can rupture and be fatal if not treated.

It is also important to include questions about a family history of cardiovascular disease, risk factors such as smoking, high cholesterol, diabetes, and obesity, and any chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness symptoms.

It’s important to note that a pre-activity health screening questionnaire is not intended to diagnose or rule out any specific condition, but it’s a way to identify potential risk factors and symptoms that may require further evaluation by a healthcare professional.

How do you create a validity of a questionnaire?

Creating a valid questionnaire is an important step in the survey development process, as it ensures that the questions measure what they are intended to measure and that the results can be interpreted accurately. Here are a few steps you can take to create the validity of a questionnaire:

  1. Content validity refers to the extent to which the questions on the questionnaire are relevant and appropriate to the topic being studied. To establish content validity, you can review the questions by experts in the field or by a sample of the target population to ensure that the questions are clear and meaningful.
  2. Criterion-related validity refers to how the questionnaire relates to other measures of the same construct. To establish criterion-related validity, you can compare the results of the questionnaire to other measures of the same construct, such as a standard gold test or another questionnaire.
  3. Construct validity refers to the extent to which the questionnaire measures a hypothetical construct or trait. To establish construct validity, you can conduct factor analysis or confirmatory factor analysis to determine if the questions on the questionnaire load onto the expected factors or constructs.
  4. Test-retest reliability: This refers to the consistency of the questionnaire over time. To establish test-retest reliability, you can administer the questionnaire to the same sample twice and compare the results.
  5. Internal consistency reliability: This refers to the consistency of the questionnaire within a single administration. To establish internal consistency reliability, you can calculate Cronbach’s alpha, a statistical measure of the consistency of the questionnaire.

It’s important to note that the validity of a questionnaire can be affected by the sample, the administration method, and the time frame; therefore, it’s important to test the validity of a questionnaire in the population and setting in which it will be used.

How to scale the questionnaire?

Scaling a questionnaire refers to assigning numerical values to responses to quantify the data and make it easier to analyze. Several different types of scales can be used to measure different constructs, here are a few common ones:

  1. Nominal scale: This is a simple way to categorize responses without any particular order. For example, in a question that asks for the gender of the respondent (male or female)
  2. Ordinal scale: This scale assigns values to responses in a specific order, but there is no equal interval between the values. For example, in a question that asks respondents to rate their satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5.
  3. Interval scale: This scale assigns values to responses in a specific order and there is an equal interval between the values. For example, in a question that asks respondents to rate their temperature on a scale of 0 to 100 degrees.
  4. Ratio scale: This scale assigns values to responses in a specific order and there is an equal interval between the values. Additionally, it has a true zero point. For example, in a question that asks respondents to indicate their weight in kilograms.

Choosing the appropriate scale for your questions is important based on the type of data you are trying to collect and the type of analysis you plan to conduct. Additionally, it’s important to provide clear instructions on the questionnaire, such as providing examples of the type of response expected or providing a labeled scale.

How to create an electronic questionnaire?

To create an electronic questionnaire, you can use a survey tool or form builder, such as Google Forms, SurveyMonkey, or Type form. Here are the general steps:

  1. Choose a survey tool or form builder that meets your needs and sign up for an account.
  2. Create a new questionnaire or survey.
  3. Add questions to the questionnaire by selecting the type of question (e.g. multiple choice, open-ended) and entering the question text.
  4. Customize the appearance of the questionnaire, such as adding a logo or changing the color scheme.
  5. Preview the questionnaire to ensure that it looks and functions as intended.
  6. Share the questionnaire by sending the link to participants or embedding it on a website.
  7. Collect responses and analyze the data.

It’s important to keep in mind the best practices for creating questionnaires and the ethical considerations of online surveys.

How to cite an adapted questionnaire?

To cite an adapted questionnaire, you should include information about the original source of the questionnaire and any changes you made to it. Here is an example of how you might cite an adapted questionnaire:

Original source: Smith, J. (2010). Quality of life questionnaire. Journal of Health Psychology, 15(4), 567-573.

Adapted by: Jones, R. (2018). Adapted quality of life questionnaire. Unpublished manuscript.

In the citation, you should include the author, date, and title of the original questionnaire, as well as any information about the adaptation, such as the author, date, and title of the adaptation, and any information about unpublished manuscripts.

It is also important to indicate in the manuscript the procedure of adaptation and the reasons behind it, if it was extensive or not, and if the original author approved it or not.

What type of questions should not be included in a questionnaire?

Certain types of questions should generally not be included in a questionnaire because they can lead to biased or inaccurate responses. These include:

  1. Leading questions: These are questions that suggest a specific answer or that are phrased in a way that influences the respondent’s answer. For example, “Don’t you think that X is a good idea?”
  2. Double-barreled questions: These ask about more than one thing at a time, making it difficult for the respondent to answer. For example, “How satisfied are you with the service and the food at this restaurant?”
  3. Complex or technical questions: These are questions that use jargon or technical language that the respondent may not understand. This can lead to confusion and inaccurate answers.
  4. Personal or sensitive questions: These ask about personal or sensitive information that the respondent may not want to disclose. Examples include questions about income, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and so on.
  5. Loaded or emotive questions: These are questions that use emotive or loaded language that can evoke an emotional response from the respondent. For example, “How do you feel about the government’s handling of the current crisis?”

It is always good to keep in mind that a questionnaire should be designed to obtain accurate and reliable data, so it is important to avoid questions that may bias or influence the respondent’s answers.

How many items should a questionnaire have?

The number of items (questions) in a questionnaire can vary depending on the research question, the population being studied, and the purpose of the questionnaire. However, as a general rule, a questionnaire should have enough items to gather the necessary data, but not so many that it becomes burdensome for the respondents to complete.

In general, questionnaires with fewer items (e.g. less than 20) are considered short, those with moderate number of items (e.g. 20-50) are considered moderate-length, and those with large number of items (e.g. over 50) are considered long.

It is worth noting that a short questionnaire may not be able to provide enough information to answer the research question, while a long questionnaire may be time-consuming and difficult for the respondents to complete, resulting in a lower response rate. Also, the length of the questionnaire can also affect the time it takes to analyze the data, so it’s important to keep in mind the resources available for the study.

In summary, the number of items in a questionnaire should be determined by the research question, the population being studied, and the purpose of the questionnaire. It should be enough to gather the necessary data, but not so many that it becomes burdensome for the respondents to complete.

How to design questionnaire psychology?

Designing a questionnaire in psychology involves several steps, including:

  1. Defining the research question: The first step in designing a questionnaire is clearly defining the research question and the population being studied. This will help to determine the type of information that needs to be collected and the number of items that should be included in the questionnaire.
  2. Choosing the format and response scale: Decide whether the questionnaire will be open-ended or closed-ended (i.e. multiple choice). Closed-ended questions are more efficient but open-ended questions allows for more flexibility and in-depth information. Also, decide on the type of response scale to be used, such as a Likert scale, semantic differential scale, or visual analog scale.
  3. Writing the questions: The questions should be clear, simple, and easy to understand. Avoid leading, double-barreled, complex or technical, personal or sensitive, and loaded or emotive questions. Also, ensure that the questions are relevant to the research question and appropriate for the studied population.
  4. Pretesting the questionnaire: Before administering the questionnaire to the final sample, it is important to pretest it with a small sample of individuals similar to the studied population. This will help to identify any problems or ambiguities in the questionnaire and make necessary revisions.
  5. Analyzing the data: After collecting the data, it is important to analyze it in a way that is appropriate for the type of data collected (e.g. descriptive statistics for closed-ended questions, content analysis for open-ended questions).
  6. Reviewing the results: After analyzing the data, the results should be reviewed to draw conclusions and make recommendations for future research.

It is also important to remember that the questionnaire design should be guided by ethical principles, such as obtaining informed consent and maintaining the confidentiality of the participants.

How to fill out a questionnaire?

Filling out a questionnaire involves several steps, including:

  1. Reading the instructions: Before filling out the questionnaire, it is important to read the instructions carefully to understand the purpose of the questionnaire and the type of information that is being requested.
  2. Answering the questions: Once you understand the instructions, you can start answering the questions. Make sure to answer all the questions, as leaving questions blank may compromise the validity of the data.
  3. Using the appropriate response format: If the questionnaire is closed-ended (i.e. multiple choice), make sure to choose the option that best represents your answer. If the questionnaire is open-ended, make sure to provide clear, concise, and honest answers.
  4. Checking for completeness and accuracy: Before submitting the questionnaire, it is important to check that all the questions have been answered, and the answers provided are accurate and complete.
  5. Submitting the questionnaire: Once you have checked the questionnaire for completeness and accuracy, you can submit it. Make sure to follow the instructions provided on how to submit the questionnaire.

It is also important to keep in mind that the information provided in the questionnaire is usually confidential, so it is important to answer truthfully and not provide any false information.

How to make an interactive questionnaire?

Creating an interactive questionnaire involves several steps, including:

  1. Defining the research question and the population being studied: As with any questionnaire, it’s important to clearly define the research question and the population being studied in order to determine the type of information that needs to be collected and the number of items that should be included in the questionnaire.
  2. Choosing a software or platform: There are a variety of software and online platforms that can be used to create interactive questionnaires, such as Google Forms, SurveyMonkey, Qualtrics, and many others. These platforms usually provide various templates and features that can be used to create an interactive questionnaire.
  3. Designing the questionnaire: Use the features provided by the software or platform to design the questionnaire engagingly and interactively. This can include adding images, videos, animations, and other multimedia elements and using different question types like drag-and-drop, sliders, and other interactive elements.
  4. Previewing and testing the questionnaire: Before publishing the questionnaire, it is important to preview and test it to make sure that it is working correctly and that the questions are being displayed correctly.
  5. Publishing and sharing the questionnaire: Once the questionnaire is ready, it can be published and shared with the participants. Some software or platforms also provide features to share the questionnaire via email, social media, or embed it on a website.
  6. Collecting and analyzing the data: The data can be collected and analyzed after the participants have completed the questionnaire. Some software or platforms provide the feature to analyze the data and generate report or export it to other software for further analysis.

It is important to note that creating an interactive questionnaire can be more time-consuming and complex than creating a traditional questionnaire, so it is important to have a good understanding of the software or platform being used, as well as the research question and population being studied.

What is the most important aspect regarding respondents to a questionnaire?

The most important aspect regarding respondents to a questionnaire is their representativeness. This means that the sample of respondents should be representative of the population being studied, in terms of characteristics such as age, gender, income, education, etc. This will help ensure that the results of the survey are generalizable and can be applied to the larger population. Additionally, ensuring that the respondents are willing and able to provide accurate and honest information is also important.

What are the weaknesses of questionnaires?

There are several weaknesses of questionnaires:

  1. Response bias: Respondents may not answer questions truthfully or may be influenced by social desirability bias.
  2. Limited response options: Respondents may feel that the response options provided do not accurately reflect their opinions or feelings.
  3. Lack of detail: Questionnaires may not elicit detailed or in-depth information about a subject.
  4. Limited to self-report: Questionnaires are based on self-report data, which may not always be accurate or reliable.
  5. Low response rate: Questionnaires may have a low response rate, which can lead to a non-representative sample.
  6. Limited to literate and educated population: People who are not literate or educated may not be able to participate in questionnaires.
  7. Limited to certain type of research: Questionnaires are not appropriate for certain types of research such as observational, experimental or in-depth research.
  8. Time consuming: Creating and distributing a questionnaire can be time-consuming, and analyzing the data can also be time-consuming.

What type of research uses questionnaires?

Questionnaires are often used in social science research, including fields such as psychology, sociology, and market research. They can be used to gather data on a wide range of topics, including attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, and demographic information. Additionally, questionnaires can be used in other fields such as health research, education research, and business research.

Is the Questionnaire A survey method?

Yes, a questionnaire is a type of survey method. Surveys are a common research method in which data is collected by asking a sample of individuals a set of questions. Questionnaires are a specific type of survey that consist of a series of questions that are presented to participants in a written or electronic format. They can be administered in a variety of ways, including by mail, online, in person, or over the phone.

What would be considered the minimum level for an adequate response rate for analysis and reporting of questionnaires?

The minimum response rate for analysis and reporting of questionnaires can vary depending on the research project and the studied population. However, in general, a response rate of at least 60% is often considered the minimum level for an adequate response rate.

Some experts recommend a response rate of at least 80% for the sample to be considered representative of the population, however, it’s also important to note that a high response rate does not guarantee that the sample is representative of the population and other factors such as sampling design, survey design, and data analysis techniques also play an important role.

It’s also important to note that lower response rates can be acceptable in certain situations, such as when the population is hard to reach or when the study is exploratory in nature. In these cases, it is important to report the response rate and to consider the potential impact of nonresponse bias on the results.

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